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Article << Previous     |         Contents Vol 34(5)

Ecological and human dimensions of management of feral horses in Australia: a review

Dale Graeme Nimmo A B, Kelly K. Miller A

A School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic. 3125, Australia.
B Corresponding author. Landscape Ecology Research Group, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic. 3125, Australia. Email: dgni@deakin.edu.au
 
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Abstract

In Australia, the management of feral horse populations is a contentious issue, owing to their pluralistic status as an introduced pest and a national icon. In this review, we synthesise current knowledge of the ecological effects of feral horses and the human dimensions of feral horse management, using case studies from around the world to illustrate contentious and successful management practices. We highlight gaps in the literature and suggest that more peer-reviewed research would be beneficial in reducing the current public controversy surrounding management of feral horses.

   
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