Health Promotion Journal of Australia Health Promotion Journal of Australia Society
Journal of the Australian Health Promotion Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Public attitudes to government intervention to regulate food advertising, especially to children

Narelle M. Berry A B E , Patricia Carter C , Rebecca Nolan C , Eleonora Dal Grande D and Sue Booth A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.

B Present address: Norwich Medical School, Floor 2, Bob Champion Research and Education Building, James Watson Road, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UQ, UK.

C Public Health and Clinical Systems, South Australian Department for Health and Ageing, PO Box 287, Rundle Mall, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia.

D Population Research and Outcomes Studies, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.

E Corresponding author. Email: n.berry@uea.ac.uk

Health Promotion Journal of Australia 28(1) 85-87 https://doi.org/10.1071/HE16065
Submitted: 9 June 2016  Accepted: 11 November 2016   Published: 9 February 2017


References

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[7]  Morley B, Chapman K, Mehta K, King L, Swinburn B, Wakefield M (2008) Parental awareness and attitudes about food advertising to children on Australian television. Aust NZ J Publ Heal 32, 341–7.
Parental awareness and attitudes about food advertising to children on Australian television.CrossRef |

[8]  Morley B, Martin J, Niven P, Wakefield M (2012) Public opinion on food-related obesity prevention policy initiatives. Health Promot J Austr 23, 86–91.

[9]  Pollard CM, Daly A, Moore M, Binns CW (2013) Public say food regulatory policies to improve health in Western Australia are important: population survey results. Aust NZ J Publ Heal 37, 475–82.
Public say food regulatory policies to improve health in Western Australia are important: population survey results.CrossRef |

[10]  Cancer Council Australia. Position statement – Food marketing to children. Cancer Council Australia. 2015. Available from: http://wiki.cancer.org.au/policy/Position_statement_-_Food_Marketing_to_children [Verified 4 November 2015]


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