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Change and stasis in sexual health and relationships: comparisons between the First and Second Australian Studies of Health and Relationships

Richard O. de Visser A I , Juliet Richters B , Chris Rissel C , Paul B. Badcock D E , Judy M. Simpson F , Anthony M. A. Smith D H and Andrew E. Grulich G
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Psychology, Pevensey 1, University of Sussex, Falmer BN1 9QH, UK.

B School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

C Sydney School of Public Health, Charles Perkins Centre (D17), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

D Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, 215 Franklin Street, Melbourne, Vic. 3000, Australia.

E Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia.

F Sydney School of Public Health, Edward Ford Building (A27), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

G Kirby Institute, Wallace Wurth Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

H Deceased.

I Corresponding author. Email: rd48@sussex.ac.uk

Sexual Health 11(5) 505-509 https://doi.org/10.1071/SH14112
Submitted: 14 June 2014  Accepted: 6 September 2014   Published: 7 November 2014


References

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