Wildlife Research Wildlife Research Society
Ecology, management and conservation in natural and modified habitats
Wildlife Research

Wildlife Research

Volume 41 Number 6 2014

Graphical Abstract Image

Disturbance can have diverse negative impacts on wildlife, and understanding behavioural responses to disturbance is important in developing sound conservation and management strategies. Endangered black-faced spoonbills (Platalea minor) in a non-breeding area demonstrated strong behavioural responses to human approach, especially at roosting areas in the presence of other waterbirds. Our study suggests that a buffer area for humans should be planned as part of wildlife management plans based on the tolerance of target and non-target species to disturbance.

Graphical Abstract Image

The scientific basis of published continental-scale estimates of individuals in Australia of feral cats, feral pigs and red kangaroos is reviewed. We do not know currently how many feral cats or feral pigs are in Australia. Our knowledge of red kangaroo abundance is stronger at the state than the continental scale, and is also out-of-date at the continental scale. We recommend greater consideration be given to the use, and not misuse, of abundance estimates in wildlife management. Photograph by Tony Buckmaster.

Graphical Abstract Image

The planting of non-native trees may modify habitat quality with deleterious consequences on its associated fauna. We determined whether exotic forestations could affect native lizard fauna; our results showed that abundances and health of the lizards were negatively associated with the replacement of the native grassland by exotic forestations. The formation of continuous forest patches should be avoided in order to maintain the structural heterogeneity of the habitat that lizards need to survive.

WR14032A recovering flagship: giant otters, communities and tourism in northern Peru

Maribel Recharte, Ian G. Bride and Mark Bowler
pp. 490-498
Graphical Abstract Image

Giant otter populations are repopulating areas near communities, leading to increased contact with fishermen. We investigate attitudes towards giant otters in rural northern Peru, to see whether negative perceptions are mitigated by involvement in tourism. Positive and negative opinions occur, with only limited changes in the perceptions of giant otters with respect to their involvement with tourism. Photograph by Maribel Recharte.

Graphical Abstract Image

Invasive vertebrate eradications are increasing in size and complexity. Managers can complete eradications more efficiently by utilising digital data collection tools to reduce cost and inform decision making. Through two case studies, we review how we used these tools to reduce data collection and processing effort, reducing the total project cost. Additionally, these systems increased eradication efficiency by allowing for the timely evaluation of operational tactics and analysis of strategic decisions.

Graphical Abstract Image

Even the most prickly or unappealing plants can provide important food and shelter resources for animals, especially in our hot, drying climate. Identifying plants required by conservation significant animals, such as the quokka, enables us to manage and protect their habitat. Such studies aid conservation of these iconic marsupials by identifying sites that can benefit from additional protection or re-planting. Photograph by Shannon Dundas.

Graphical Abstract Image

Studies on the combined effects of deforestation and climate change on tropical ecosystems are limited. This research aimed to model current and future distributions of 17 medium- to large-sized mammal species in northern Thailand and to quantify the predicted effects of these two major threats on their distributions. The results indicated that the predicted effects of deforestation were stronger than the effects of climate change and the predicted impacts were more severe when the two major threats were combined. Photograph of gaur (Bos gaurus C.H. Smith, 1827) by Kwanchai Waitanyakaran.

Graphical Abstract Image

Habitat fragmentation and the impact of aggressive honeyeaters from the genus Manorina are key threats to bird diversity across Australia. This study primarily investigated if yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula) colonies impact local bird populations in the fragmented Mallee and found that bird abundance and diversity was lower in colonies; in particular, small insect eating birds were most affected. Our findings suggest that management of these miners is likely required to prevent further loss of bird biodiversity in the fragmented landscape.

Submit Article

Use the online submission system to send us your manuscript.

Advertisement