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RESEARCH ARTICLE

Clients’ preferred methods of obtaining sexually transmissible infection or HIV results from Sydney Sexual Health Centre

Lynne Martin A C , Vickie Knight A , Phillip J. Read A B and Anna McNulty A B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Sydney Sexual Health Centre, Sydney Hospital, GPO Box 1614, Sydney, NSW 2001, Australia.

B School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia.

C Corresponding author. Email: lynne.martin@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au

Sexual Health 10(1) 91-92 https://doi.org/10.1071/SH12062
Submitted: 2 April 2012  Accepted: 4 June 2012   Published: 19 November 2012

Abstract

Given the documented benefits of using text messaging (short message service; SMS), the internet and email to deliver sexually transmissible infection (STI) test results, including high acceptability among clients, Sydney Sexual Health Centre (SSHC) aimed to identify which methods our clients preferred for receiving their results, using a cross-sectional survey. There was a preference for SMS (32%) for negative STI results, and for SMS (27%), phone call (27%) and in-person (26%) for negative HIV results. An in-person preference was shown for receiving positive STI results (40%) and positive HIV results (56%, P < 0.001). While many clients would prefer to receive STI test results via text messages or phone call, many also still prefer a return visit, with this preference is dependent on the type and nature of the results. Our study suggests that, ideally, several options for obtaining results should be available.


References

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