Reproduction, Fertility and Development Reproduction, Fertility and Development Society
Vertebrate reproductive science and technology
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Endogenous lysophosphatidic acid participates in vascularisation and decidualisation at the maternal–fetal interface in the rat

Micaela S. Sordelli A H * , Jimena S. Beltrame A * , Elsa Zotta B , Natalia Gomez C , Ganna Dmytrenko D , María Elena Sales D , Sandra M. Blois E , Carlos Davio C , Silvina Perez Martinez F , Ana M. Franchi G and María L. Ribeiro A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Laboratorio de Fisiología y Farmacología de la Reproducción, Centre for Pharmacological and Botanicals Studies (CONICET – Facultad de Medicina, University of Buenos Aires), Paraguay 2155, 16th floor, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

B Laboratorio de Fisiopatología Molecular, Cátedra de Fisiopatología, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

C Laboratorio de Farmacología de Receptores, Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

D Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacología Tumoral, CEFYBO (CONICET – Facultad de Medicina, UBA).

E Charité Centrum 12 für Innere Medizin und Dermatologie, Reproductive Medicine Research Group, University Medicine of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

F Laboratorio de Biología de la Reproducción en Mamíferos, CEFYBO (CONICET – Facultad de Medicina, UBA), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

G Laboratorio de Fisiopatología de la Preñez y al Parto, CEFYBO (CONICET – Facultad de Medicina, UBA), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

H Corresponding author. Email: micaelasordelli@yahoo.com.ar

Reproduction, Fertility and Development - https://doi.org/10.1071/RD16235
Submitted: 7 June 2016  Accepted: 12 January 2017   Published online: 5 April 2017

Abstract

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) affects several female reproductive functions through G-protein-coupled receptors. LPA contributes to embryo implantation via the lysophospholipid LPA3 receptor. In the present study we investigated the participation of endogenous LPA signalling through the LPA3 receptor in vascularisation and decidualisation, two crucial events at the maternal–fetal interface. Pregnant rats were treated with diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DGPP), a highly selective antagonist of LPA3 receptors, on Day 5 of gestation. Pregnant rats received intrauterine (i.u.) injections of single doses of DGPP (0.1 mg kg-1) in a total volume of 2 μL in the left horn (treated horn) in the morning of GD5. DGPP treatment produced aberrant embryo spacing and increased embryo resorption. The LPA3 receptor antagonist decreased the cross-sectional length of the uterine and arcuate arteries and induced histological anomalies in the decidua and placentas. Marked haemorrhagic processes, infiltration of immune cells and tissue disorganisation were observed in decidual and placental tissues from sites of resorption. The mRNA expression of three vascularisation markers, namely interleukin 10 (Il10), vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (Vegfr1), was reduced at sites of resorption from Day 8. The results show that the disruption of endogenous LPA signalling by blocking the LPA3 receptor modified the development of uterine vessels with consequences in the formation of the decidua and placenta and in the growth of embryos.

Additional keywords: decidua development, implantation, lysophospholipids, vascular response.


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