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  Rangeland Ecology & Management
 
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The Rangeland Journal publishes original work on the biophysical, social, cultural, economic, and policy influences affecting rangeland use and management. More

Editor-in-Chief: John Milne

 
 
 

blank image The Rangeland Journal
Volume 36 Number 2 2014

 
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Principles and guidelines for managing cattle grazing in the grazing lands of northern Australia: stocking rates, pasture resting, prescribed fire, paddock size and water points – a review 
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L. P. Hunt, J. G. McIvor, A. C. Grice and S. G. Bray
pp. 105-119

Sound management of beef cattle grazing in Australia's extensive tropical and sub-tropical rangelands depends on understanding how four key management factors (stocking rates, pasture resting, prescribed fire and managing grazing distribution) affect cattle production, economic returns and resource condition. We reviewed past research and identified four management principles (and associated guidelines) related to these management factors. These principles provide the basis for a sustainable livestock industry in northern Australia and, with some adaptation, to other rangeland systems in Australia and elsewhere.

 
  
 

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Characterisation of locoweeds and their effect on livestock production in the western rangelands of China: a review 
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Hao Lu, Dan Dan Cao, Feng Ma, Shan Shan Wang, Xiao Wen Yang, Wen Long Wang, Qi Wu Zhou and Bao Yu Zhao
pp. 121-131

Locoweeds, which belong to the genera Oxytropis and Astragalus, are an important species of poisonous legumes in the western rangelands of China, causing large economic losses. This review summarizes the species and their ecological distribution, the toxic ingredients, the poisoning mechanism of locoweeds and damage-control techniques for locoweeds. This review will provide a very important reference for controlling the poisoning disease caused by locoweeds and the effective use of control measures.

 
  
 

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EcoFire: regional-scale prescribed burning increases the annual carrying capacity of livestock on pastoral properties by reducing pasture loss from wildfire 
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Anja Skroblin, Sarah Legge, Terry Webb and Leigh P. Hunt
pp. 133-142

Wildfires in the northern savannas of Australia can cause substantial economic losses to pastoralists by removing extensive areas of pasture on properties, sometimes in single, catastrophic events. The results of an existing fire management program in the Kimberley Region (EcoFire) were used to calculate the potential benefit to pastoral productivity created by using prescribed burning to reduce the frequency and extent of wildfires. Although the potential benefits are large, fire management will need to be integrated with livestock management in order to ensure sustainability.

 
 

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Assessing the magnitude of impact of volcanic ash deposits on Merino wool production and fibre traits in the context of a drought in North-west Patagonia, Argentina 
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M. H. Easdale, D. Sacchero, M. Vigna and P. Willems
pp. 143-149

Most extensive livestock production systems in arid environments worldwide are influenced by climate, and some regions are exposed to non-climatic factors such as volcano eruption and ash deposits. We found that volcanic ash deposits in the context of a regional drought significantly affected Merino wool production and fibre quality traits in farms from North-western Patagonia, Argentina. It is argued that measures of livestock production, such as wool weight and quality, should be included in environmental monitoring systems for hazard mitigation and emergency intervention programs to support policy decision-making.

 
  
 

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Grazing in sagebrush rangelands in western North America: implications for habitat quality for a sagebrush specialist, the pygmy rabbit 
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Meghan J. Camp, Janet L. Rachlow, Lisa A. Shipley, Timothy R. Johnson and Kelly D. Bockting
pp. 151-159

Livestock grazing is one of the primary uses of sagebrush rangelands in western North America; therefore, it is important to understand how grazing might affect habitat for native wildlife. The effects of cattle grazing on components of habitat for an uncommon animal that inhabitants sagebrush rangelands, the pygmy rabbit, which has been petitioned for endangered or threatened status in the USA, was studied and it was found that grazing influenced some, but not all aspects of the habitat of pygmy rabbits. Understanding how cattle grazing influences habitat for pygmy rabbits and other sagebrush-dependent wildlife can guide conservation and management strategies for these species on sagebrush rangelands managed under multiple-use policies.

 
  
 

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A comparison of stocking methods for beef production in northern Australia: pasture and soil surface condition responses 
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Trevor J. Hall, John G. McIvor, David J. Reid, Paul Jones, Neil D. MacLeod, Cam K. McDonald and David R. Smith
pp. 161-174

Seven continuous stocking methods, which included annual rest periods, six extensive rotations and eight intensive rotation methods, commonly referred to as cell systems, were monitored on nine commercial beef properties across Queensland between 2006 and 2009. Across all sites there were no consistent differences in pastures, soil surface condition or grazing capacity between the three methods (continuous, extensive rotation and intensive rotation). There were within-site differences between methods in grazing capacity on four properties. At all sites the final 2 years were above average in rainfall and produced the greatest differences in pastures and soil surface condition compared with the previous 2 drought years. The information obtained allows decisions to be made on which stocking methods are most appropriate for a particular set of circumstances.

 
  
 

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Spatially-explicit modelling of grassland classes – an improved method of integrating a climate-based classification model with interpolated climate surfaces 
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Xiaoni Liu, Hongxia Wang, Jing Guo, Jingqiong Wei, Zhengchao Ren, Jinglan Zhang, Degang Zhang, Dongrong Pan and Fengping Wang
pp. 175-183

Classifying grassland is important in planning for grassland and environmental management. It is difficult, however, to classify grassland over a large area with limited time and resources. In this study, a climate-based classification system was used with a combination of spatial climate data to classify grasslands in the Gansu province, China. Twenty-six grassland classes were identified. The study demonstrated the feasibility of the method and the results provide useful information to support grassland and environmental management.

 
  
 

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Assessing the impact of seasonal precipitation and temperature on vegetation in a grass-dominated rangeland 
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Fang Chen and Keith T. Weber
pp. 185-190

Classifying grassland is important in planning for grassland and environmental management. It is difficult, however, to classify grassland over a large area with limited time and resources. In this study, a climate-based classification system was used with a combination of spatial climate data to classify grasslands in the Gansu province, China. Twenty-six grassland classes were identified. The study demonstrated the feasibility of the method and the results provide useful information to support grassland and environmental management.

 
  
 

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Remotely-sensed analysis of ground-cover change in Queensland’s rangelands, 1988–2005 
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G. Bastin, R. Denham, P. Scarth, A. Sparrow and V. Chewings
pp. 191-204

Monitoring the impact of grazing on native vegetation in Queensland is difficult due to the effect that considerable year-to-year variability in rainfall has on pasture growth. Much of the ~640 000 km2 of grazed rangeland analysed between 1988 and the mid 2000s had increased levels of seasonally-adjusted cover when a dynamic reference-cover method was applied to remotely sensed ground cover. This largely automated method effectively identifies grazing effects and can be applied in other rangeland areas where a suitable Landsat archive of ground-cover exists.

 
  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    RJ13117  Accepted 07 April 2014
    A rapid survey method for estimating population density of European rabbits living in native vegetation
    Greg Mutze, Brian Cooke, Mark Lethbridge, Scott Jennings
    Abstract


    RJ13108  Accepted 07 April 2014
    Phosphorus availability influences the growth and productivity of Themeda triandra Forssk. and Microlaena stipoides (Labill.) R.Br.
    Cameron Clark, Meredith Mitchell, Rafiq Islam, Brent Jacobs
    Abstract


    RJ13091  Accepted 07 April 2014
    Foliar herbicide control of sticky florestina (Florestina tripteris DC.)
    John McKenzie, Dannielle Brazier, Shane Campbell, Joseph Vitelli, Angela Anderson, Robert Mayer
    Abstract


    RJ13088  Accepted 07 April 2014
    Effects of mowing regimes and climate variability on hay production of Leymus chinensis grassland in northern China
    Taogetao Baoyin, Frank Yonghong Li, Qinghai Bao, Hugjiltu Minggagud, Yankai Zhong
    Abstract


    RJ14003  Accepted 21 March 2014
    Life histories of two arid zone shrubs change with differences in habitat, grazing and climate.
    Phillip Norman, Robert Denham, Moya Calvert
    Abstract




The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 18 June 2013
Revegetation with Australian native grasses – a reassessment of the importance of using local provenances

R. D. B. Whalley, I. H. Chivers and C. M. Waters

2. Published 18 June 2013
Understanding ecosystem dynamics in South Australia’s arid lands: a framework to assist biodiversity conservation

Allen P. McIlwee, Daniel Rogers, Phil Pisanu, Robert Brandle and John McDonald

3. Published 22 July 2013
Vegetation changes through the eyes of the locals: the ‘artificial wilderness’ in the mulga country of south-west Queensland

G. B. Witt

4. Published 18 June 2013
Scaling results up from a plot and paddock scale to a property – a case study from a long-term grazing experiment in northern Australia

J. C. Scanlan, N. D. MacLeod and P. J. O'Reagain

5. Published 18 June 2013
Alternative strategies for management of feral goats: implications for natural resource management policies in New South Wales rangelands

S. A. Khairo, R. B. Hacker, T. L. Atkinson and G. L. Turnbull

6. Published 21 October 2013
Landscape ecology: its role as a trans-disciplinary science for rangeland sustainability

Diane M. Pearson

7. Published 13 January 2014
Establishing the carrying capacity of the grasslands of China: a review

Y. J. Zhang, X. Q. Zhang, X. Y. Wang, N. Liu and H. M. Kan

8. Published 18 June 2013
Balancing trade-offs between biodiversity and production in the re-design of rangeland landscapes

C. M. Waters, T. D. Penman, R. B. Hacker, B. Law, R. P. Kavanagh, F. Lemckert and Y. Alemseged

9. Published 18 June 2013
Dust storms – what do they really cost?

P. Tozer and J. Leys

10. Published 13 January 2014
Incorporating farmed goats into sustainable rangeland grazing systems in southern Australia: a review

Ronald B. Hacker and Yohannes Alemseged

11. Published 13 January 2014
Can changes to pasture management reduce runoff and sediment loss to the Great Barrier Reef? The results of a 10-year study in the Burdekin catchment, Australia

Rebecca Bartley, Jeff P. Corfield, Aaron A. Hawdon, Anne E. Kinsey-Henderson, Brett N. Abbott, Scott N. Wilkinson and Rex J. Keen

12. Published 22 July 2013
Grassland dynamics in response to climate change and human activities in Inner Mongolia, China between 1985 and 2009

S. J. Mu, Y. Z. Chen, J. L. Li, W. M. Ju, I. O. A. Odeh and X. L. Zou

13. Published 18 June 2013
A more effective means of delivering conservation management: a ‘New Integrated Conservation’ model for Australian rangelands

Matt Salmon and Rolf Gerritsen

14. Published 3 April 2014
Principles and guidelines for managing cattle grazing in the grazing lands of northern Australia: stocking rates, pasture resting, prescribed fire, paddock size and water points – a review

L. P. Hunt, J. G. McIvor, A. C. Grice and S. G. Bray

15. Published 18 June 2013
Global trends in population, energy use and climate: implications for policy development, rangeland management and rangeland users

Jerry L. Holechek

16. Published 18 June 2013
Using economic, social and ecological spatial patterns to guide policy development in the Pilbara and Southern Rangelands of Western Australia

Rodney Safstrom and Peter-Jon Waddell

17. Published 18 June 2013
Relic bilby (Macrotis lagotis) refuge burrows: assessment of potential contribution to a rangeland restoration program

Tamra F. Chapman

18. Published 22 July 2013
The validation of a model estimating the Leaf Area Index of grasslands in southern China

Chengming Sun, Zhengguo Sun, Tao Liu, Doudou Guo, Shaojie Mu, Hongfei Yang, Weimin Ju and Jianlong Li

19. Published 13 January 2014
Introduction of Dorper sheep into Australian rangelands: implications for production and natural resource management

Yohannes Alemseged and Ronald B. Hacker

20. Published 18 June 2013
A framework for optimising capital investment and operations in livestock logistics

Andrew Higgins, Ian Watson, Chris Chilcott, Mingwei Zhou, Rodolfo García-Flores, Sandra Eady, Stephen McFallan, Di Prestwidge and Luis Laredo


      
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Volume 36 (2)

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