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Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 44(6)

Temporal and spatial variation in the abundance of fish associated with the seagrass Posidonia australis in South-eastern Australia

DJ Ferrell, SE McNeill, DG Worthington and JD Bell

Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 44(6) 881 - 899
Published: 1993

Abstract

A beam trawl was used to sample fish associated with the seagrass Posidonia australis between September 1988 and June 1990. We describe variation in abundance of fish at two spatial scales: among three seagrass beds 1-10 km apart within each of three estuaries, and among the estuaries separated by at least 100 km. Most species had significant differences in abundance among sites and estuaries that changed through time. However, many species also had consistent patterns in abundance among sites and among estuaries. For example, there were large and consistent differences in the abundance of many species among the three estuaries. Widespread changes in abundance (ie: changes that took place at all sites within an estuary or in most estuaries) were not common. The two spatial scales used in this study are also logical scales for management of seagrass habitats. The consistent differences in abundance of some fish found at both spatial scales will complicate management decisions.



Full text doi:10.1071/MF9930881

© CSIRO 1993

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