Animal Production Science Animal Production Science Society
Food, fibre and pharmaceuticals from animals
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Methane emissions differ between sheep offered a conventional diploid, a high-sugar diploid or a tetraploid perennial ryegrass cultivar at two allowances at three times of the year

A. Jonker A E , G. Molano A , E. Sandoval A , P. S. Taylor B , C. Antwi A C , S. Olinga A D and G. P. Cosgrove B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Animal Nutrition and Physiology, Grasslands Research Centre, AgResearch Ltd, Tennent Drive, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.

B Forage Improvement, Grasslands Research Centre, AgResearch Ltd, Tennent Drive, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.

C Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

D Nabuin Zonal, National Agricultural Research Organisation (Nabuin-ZARDI), PB 132 Moroto, Uganda.

E Corresponding author. Email: arjan.jonker@agresearch.co.nz

Animal Production Science - https://doi.org/10.1071/AN15597
Submitted: 15 September 2015  Accepted: 7 March 2016   Published online: 12 May 2016

Abstract

Elevated water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentration in the diet may affect rumen fermentation and consequently reduce methane (CH4) emissions. The objective of the present study was to determine CH4 emissions from male sheep (8 per treatment) in respiration chambers for 48 h and fed either a conventional diploid (CRG), a high-sugar diploid (HSG) or a tetraploid (TRG) perennial ryegrass cultivar, each offered at 0.7 or 1.0 kg dry matter (DM)/day during periods in early spring 2013 (P1), early autumn 2014 (P2) and late spring 2014 (P3). There was a significant (P < 0.001) interaction between cultivar and period for CH4 yield (g/kg DM intake). In P1 yield was 9% lower (P = 0.007) for sheep fed HSG than for sheep fed CRG or TRG, in P2 yield was 16% lower (P < 0.001) for sheep fed TRG than that for sheep fed CRG or HSG, and in P3 yield was 15% lower (P < 0.001) for sheep fed TRG than that for sheep fed CRG, with HSG-fed sheep being intermediate and not significantly different from either CRG or TRG. Despite there being a cultivar × period interaction, overall, CH4 yield was lower for sheep fed HSG or TRG than for sheep fed CRG (P < 0.001). There were no cultivar × level of feed offer interactions and, overall, yield of CH4 was 9% higher (P = 0.003) for sheep offered 0.7 than for sheep offered 1.0 kg DM/day. In each period, one or other of the high-WSC diploid (HSG) or tetraploid cultivars (TRG) gave lower CH4 yields than did the control diploid (CRG), suggesting that CH4 yield is reduced by characteristics of these cultivars. However, the effect was not consistently associated with either cultivar and could not be attributed to higher forage water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations.

Additional keywords: fresh pasture, greenhouse gas, Lolium perenne, water-soluble carbohydrates.


References

AOAC (1990) ‘Official methods of analysis.’ 15 edn. (Association of Official Analytical Chemists: Arlington, VA)

Blaxter KL, Clapperton JL (1965) Prediction of the amount of methane produced by ruminants. British Journal of Nutrition 19, 511–522.
Prediction of the amount of methane produced by ruminants.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaF28XitFKktg%3D%3D&md5=6cde6902b771bbb1af70db2dca0760aaCAS | 5852118PubMed |

Clark H, Brookes IM, Walcroft A (2003) Enteric methane emissions from New Zealand ruminants 1990–2001 calculated using IPPC tier 2 approach. Report prepared for Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Wellington, New Zealand.

Cosgrove GP, Mapp NR, Taylor PS, Harvey BM, Knowler KJ (2014) The chemical composition of high-sugar and control ryegrasses in grazed pasture at different latitudes throughout New Zealand. Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 76, 169–176.

Cosgrove GP, Taylor PS, Jonker A (2015) Sheep performance on perennial ryegrass differing in concentration of water soluble carbohydrates. Journal of New Zealand Grasslands 77, 143–150.

Demeyer DI (1991) Quantitative aspects of microbial metabolism in the rumen and hind gut. In ‘Rumen microbial metabolism and ruminant digestion’. Ed. (JP Journay) pp. 217–237. (INRA Editions: Paris, France)

Ellis JL, Dijkstra J, France J, Parsons AJ, Edwards GR, Rasmussen S, Kebreab E, Bannink A (2012) Effect of high-sugar grasses on methane emissions simulated using a dynamic model. Journal of Dairy Science 95, 272–285.
Effect of high-sugar grasses on methane emissions simulated using a dynamic model.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3MXhs1OlsrjK&md5=90a698d519c12f9810a83fb6f8645601CAS | 22192207PubMed |

Hammond KJ, Muetzel S, Waghorn GC, Pinares-Patiño CS, Burke JL, Hoskin SO (2009) The variation in methane emissions from sheep and cattle is not explained by the chemical composition of ryegrass. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animal Production 69, 174–178.

Huhtanen P, Robertson S (1988) The effect of dietary inclusion of starch, sucrose and xylose on the utilization of dietary energy in sheep. Animal Feed Science and Technology 21, 11–21.
The effect of dietary inclusion of starch, sucrose and xylose on the utilization of dietary energy in sheep.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaL1MXmvVaj&md5=81d610d07169d8b1a4aeae1886975666CAS |

Hume DE, Hickey MJ, Lyons TB, Baird DB (2010) Agronomic performance and water-soluble carbohydrate expression of selected ryegrasses at two locations in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 53, 37–57.
Agronomic performance and water-soluble carbohydrate expression of selected ryegrasses at two locations in New Zealand.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3cXktlCitLg%3D&md5=de160cbda32b4eed77a090506a09d915CAS |

Humphreys MO (1989) Water-soluble carbohydrates in perennial ryegrass breeding II Cultivar and hybrid progeny performance in cut plots. Grass and Forage Science 44, 237–244.
Water-soluble carbohydrates in perennial ryegrass breeding II Cultivar and hybrid progeny performance in cut plots.CrossRef |

Iglewicz B, Hoaglin D (1993) ‘How to detect and handle outliers.’ (American Society for Quality Control: Milwaukee, WI, USA)

Janssen PH (2010) Influence of hydrogen on rumen methane formation and fermentation balances through microbial growth kinetics and fermentation thermodynamics. Animal Feed Science and Technology 160, 1–22.
Influence of hydrogen on rumen methane formation and fermentation balances through microbial growth kinetics and fermentation thermodynamics.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3cXhtV2itLvF&md5=8b633b0832b1c0985b793ee6af3ece67CAS |

Jermyn MA (1956) A new method for determining ketohexoses in the presence of aldohexoses. Nature 177, 38–39.
A new method for determining ketohexoses in the presence of aldohexoses.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaG28XjsFKjtg%3D%3D&md5=5a7b485466eb2b696b2cff69b05c2cb6CAS |

Johnson KA, Johnson DE (1995) Methane emissions from cattle. Journal of Animal Science 73, 2483–2492.

Jonker A, Molano G, Sandoval E, Taylor PS, Antwi C, Cosgrove GP (2014) BRIEF COMMUNICATION: methane emissions by sheep offered high sugar or conventional perennial ryegrass at two allowances. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animal Production 74, 145–147.

Jonker A, Cheng L, Edwards GR, Molano G, Taylor PS, Sandoval E, Cosgrove GP (2015) Nitrogen partitioning in sheep offered three perennial ryegrass cultivars at two allowances in spring and autumn. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animal Production 75, 74–78.

Kim EJ, Newbold CJ, Scollan ND (2011) Effect of water-soluble carbohydrate in fresh forage on growth and methane production by growing lambs. Advances in Animal Biosciences 2, 270

Lee MRF, Merry RJ, Davies DR, Moorby JM, Humphreys MO, Theodorou MK, MacRae JC, Scollan ND (2003) Effect of increasing availability of water-soluble carbohydrates on in vitro rumen fermentation. Animal Feed Science and Technology 104, 59–70.
Effect of increasing availability of water-soluble carbohydrates on in vitro rumen fermentation.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD3sXht1Ghtbs%3D&md5=2fbc3e90738842d7d0b3da28fe7e21c8CAS |

Luo J, de Klein CAM, Ledgard SF, Saggar S (2010) Management options to reduce nitrous oxide emissions from intensively grazed pastures: a review. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 136, 282–291.
Management options to reduce nitrous oxide emissions from intensively grazed pastures: a review.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3cXisFentbc%3D&md5=257c6d08a833998dfee3f5439831c35bCAS |

MfE (2013) ‘New Zealand’s greenhouse gas inventory 1990–2011.’ Ref. ME 113. (Ministry for the Environment: Wellington, New Zealand)

Muetzel S, Clark H (2015) Methane emissions from sheep fed fresh pasture. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 58, 472–489.
Methane emissions from sheep fed fresh pasture.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC2MXhvFKks7bP&md5=7eda8b5b6a30966bf11cda68efc45988CAS |

NRC (2001) ‘National Research Council. Nutrient requirements of dairy cattle.’ 7th revised edn. (National Academy Press: Washington, DC, USA)

Pinares-Patiño CS, Hunt C, Martin R, West J, Lovejoy P, Waghorn GC (2012) Chapter 1: New Zealand Ruminant Methane Measurement Centre, AgResearch, Palmerston North. In ‘Technical manual on respiration chamber design’. (Eds CS Pinares-Patiño, GC Waghorn). Report prepared for Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Wellington, New Zealand.

Purcell PJ, Boland HT, O’Kiely P (2014) The effect of water-soluble carbohydrate concentration and type on in vitro rumen methane output of perennial ryegrass determined using 24-hour batch-culture gas production technique. Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research 53, 21–36.

Robertson JB, Van Soest PJ (1981) The detergent system of analysis and its application to human foods. In ‘The analysis of dietary fiber in foods’. (Eds W James, O Theander) pp. 123–158. (Marcel Dekker Inc.: New York, NY, USA)

Sauvant D, Giger-Reverdin S (2009) Modélisation des interactions digestives et de la production de méthane chez les ruminants. [Modelling digestive interactions and methane production in ruminants]. Productions Animales 22, 375–384. [In French]

Sun X, Henderson G, Cox F, Molano G, Harrison SJ, Luo D, Janssen PH, Pacheco D (2015) Lambs fed fresh winter forage rape (Brassica napus L.) emit less methane than those fed perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), and possible mechanisms behind the difference. PLoS One 10, 1–16.

Tavendale MH, Meagher LP, Pacheco D, Walker N, Attwood GT, Sivakumaran S (2005) Methane production from in vitro rumen incubations with Lotus pedunculatus and Medicago sativa, and effects of extractable condensed tannin fractions on methanogenesis. Animal Feed Science and Technology 123–124, 403–419.
Methane production from in vitro rumen incubations with Lotus pedunculatus and Medicago sativa, and effects of extractable condensed tannin fractions on methanogenesis.CrossRef |



Export Citation