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Comparative effects of powder, aqueous, and methanolic extracts of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) on growth performance, antioxidant status, abdominal fat deposition, and plasma lipids in broiler chickens

Mahmood Habibian , Ghorbanali Sadeghi , Ahmad Karimi

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the comparative effects of dietary supplementation of dried purslane powder (PP), purslane aqueous extract (PAE), and purslane methanolic extract (PME) on performance, antioxidant status, carcass traits, and selected plasma lipid parameters in broiler chickens. In total, 420 1-day-old male broiler chicks were divided into seven treatments for 49 days as follows: control (basal diet), basal diets plus 1,500 or 3,000 mg/kg of PP (PP1,500 and PP3,000, respectively), basal diets plus 150 or 300 mg/kg of PAE (PAE150 and PAE300, respectively), and basal diets plus 150 or 300 mg/kg of PME (PME150 and PME300, respectively). During the total period of experiment (0 to 49 days of experiment), birds receiving PP3,000 diet had higher (P < 0.05) bodyweight gain and a lower feed conversion ratio compared to those fed other diets. At 24 and 49 days of experiment, birds receiving PP3,000 diet exhibited greater (P < 0.05) plasma and liver activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and lower (P < 0.05) plasma and liver levels of malondi¬aldehyde (MDA) compared to other dietary treatments. Additionally, at 24 days of experiment, birds receiving PP3,000 diet had a greater (P < 0.05) liver catalase (CAT) activity than those receiving other dietary treatments. In addition, groups receiving PP1,500, PAE300, or PME300 diets exhibited greater (P < 0.05) plasma and liver activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx as well as lower (P < 0.05) plasma and liver levels of MDA compared to control group. At 24 days of experiment, birds receiving PP1,500 or PP3,000 diets showed greater (P < 0.05) jejunal activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx than other groups. At 49 days of experiment, birds receiving PP3,000 diet exhibited greater (P < 0.05) jejunal activities of SOD and GPx compared to control group. Additionally, at both 24 and 49 days of experiment, groups receiving PP3,000 diet had lower (P < 0.05) jejunal levels of MDA compared to control group. At 49 days of experiment, birds receiving PP3,000 diet had a lower (P < 0.05) relative weight of abdominal fat compared to those receiving other dietary treatments. Moreover, groups that consumed PP1,500, PAE300, or PME300 diets showed lower (P < 0.05) relative weights of abdominal fat compared to control group. Groups fed PP, PAE, or PME treatments showed lower (P < 0.05) plasma levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol and higher (P < 0.05) plasma levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol than the control group at 24 and 49 days of experiment, with the most pronounced effects observed in those receiving the PP3000 treatment. In conclusion, PP showed more beneficial effects than PAE and PME, and 3000 mg/kg was the best inclusion level of PP in broiler chicken diets.

AN17352  Accepted 16 August 2017

© CSIRO 2017