Invertebrate Systematics Invertebrate Systematics Society
Systematics, phylogeny and biogeography
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Diversity, complementary distributions and taxonomy of Rhagada land snails (Gastropoda : Camaenidae) on the Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia

Michael S. Johnson A E , Sean Stankowski A B , Peter G. Kendrick C , Zoë R. Hamilton A and Roy J. Teale A D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

B Current address: Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-5289, USA.

C Department of Parks and Wildlife, PO Box 835, Karratha, WA 6714, Australia.

D Biota Environmental Sciences Pty Ltd, PO Box 155, Leederville, WA 6903, Australia.

E Corresponding author. Email: mike.johnson@uwa.edu.au

Invertebrate Systematics 30(4) 323-334 https://doi.org/10.1071/IS15046
Submitted: 18 October 2015  Accepted: 19 February 2016   Published: 31 August 2016

Abstract

Phylogenetic diversity of Rhagada land snails is high on the Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia, with four distinct clades, representing three of the four major clades of the Pilbara region. Detailed sampling indicated little geographic overlap of the four clades, conforming to the general rarity of congeneric sympatry in Australian camaenids. The diversity on the Burrup Peninsula includes three previously unclassified morphotypes. One of these lies within the broad endemic clade of the adjacent Dampier Archipelago, and is provisionally assigned to the island species R. perprima, based on phylogenetic evidence. The two other undescribed morphotypes constitute an endemic clade that is the sister group of the broader Dampier Archipelago clade. All COI p-distances within clades are less than 6%, whereas nearly all distances between clades exceed 10%, the gap corresponding to differences among species of Rhagada generally. One morphotype in the Burrup Peninsula endemic clade has a low spire and a distinctive keel, and is restricted to a single rockpile. Detailed local sampling revealed gradation between this form and the more widely distributed globose morphotype. On the basis of genetic similarity and morphological continuity, we describe the morphologically variable endemic Burrup Peninsula clade as Rhagada ngurrana, sp. nov., which has a distribution spanning only 9 km.


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