Marine and Freshwater Research Marine and Freshwater Research Society
Advances in the aquatic sciences
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Transcoelomic expulsion of an ingested foreign object by a carcharhinid shark

S. T. Kessel A H , J. Fraser B , W. G. Van Bonn C , J. L. Brooks D , T. L. Guttridge E , N. E. Hussey F and S. H. Gruber G
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation and Research, John G. Shedd Aquarium, 1200 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA.

B Ocean Artworks LLC, Boynton Beach, FL 33435, USA.

C A. Watson Armour III Center for Animal Health and Welfare, John G. Shedd Aquarium, 1200S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL, 60605, USA.

D Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.

E Bimini Biological Field Station Foundation, South Bimini, Bahamas.

F Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4, Canada.

G Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33149, USA.

H Corresponding author. Email: skessel80@gmail.com

Marine and Freshwater Research 68(11) 2173-2177 https://doi.org/10.1071/MF17022
Submitted: 27 January 2017  Accepted: 2 May 2017   Published: 13 July 2017

Abstract

A wild lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris) was observed to expel an ingested foreign object through its body wall, over a minimum period of 435 days. We observed this lemon shark at a recreational diving feeding site off the coast of Juno Beach (FL, USA) on 12 occasions between 6 December 2014 and 14 December 2016. At the final observation, following expulsion, we observed this lemon shark with scar tissue and in apparent healthy condition. At minimum, this lemon shark was able to survive for over 1 year under perforation of its stomach lining, coelom and body wall. This account provides further evidence for the resilience and recovery capabilities of elasmobranch fish.

Additional keywords: deep hook, diver observation, gut hook, lemon shark, stomach eversion, spiral valve eversion.


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