CSIRO Publishing blank image blank image blank image blank imageBooksblank image blank image blank image blank imageJournalsblank image blank image blank image blank imageAbout Usblank image blank image blank image blank imageShopping Cartblank image blank image blank image You are here: Journals > International Journal of Wildland Fire   
International Journal of Wildland Fire
http://www.iawfonline.org/
  Published on behalf of the International Association of Wildland Fire
 
blank image Search
 
blank image blank image
blank image
 
  Advanced Search
   

Journal Home
About the Journal
Editorial Structure
Contacts
Content
Online Early
Current Issue
Just Accepted
All Issues
Special Issues
Research Fronts
Sample Issue
20-Year Author Index
For Authors
General Information
Scope
Submit Article
Author Instructions
Open Access
For Referees
Referee Guidelines
Review an Article
For Subscribers
Subscription Prices
Customer Service
Print Publication Dates

blue arrow e-Alerts
blank image
Subscribe to our Email Alert or RSS feeds for the latest journal papers.

red arrow Connect with CP
blank image
facebook twitter LinkedIn

red arrow Connect with IAWF
blank image
facebook twitter LinkedIn

 
 

International Journal of Wildland Fire welcomes papers on basic and applied aspects of wildland fire science including, but not confined to, ecological impact, modelling fire and its effects, and management of fire. More

Editors in Chief: Susan G. Conard and Stefan Doerr

 
 
 

blank image The peer-reviewed and edited version of record published online before inclusion in an issue. blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 30 July 2015
Effect of mastication and other mechanical treatments on fuel structure in chaparral 
Teresa J. Brennan and Jon E. Keeley

Mechanical fuel treatments differ significantly between treatment types, yet all types alter fuel structure in shrub-dominated chaparral by transforming live-canopy fuels to a compacted layer of dead surface fuels. The effectiveness of these treatments, however, is short term due to the rapid regrowth of shrubs, and is compromised by the increase in herbaceous fuels.

blank image
 
    | Supplementary Material (149 KB)
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 30 July 2015
Impacts of repeated wildfire on long-unburned plant communities of the southern Appalachian Mountains 
Donald L. Hagan, Thomas A. Waldrop, Matthew Reilly and Timothy M. Shearman

Five severe wildfires between 2000 and 2008 provided a unique opportunity to study how burning influences plant communities across Appalachian landscapes. This study assessed how plant community structure, composition, cover, richness and diversity in unburned areas differed from areas burned once or twice.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 30 July 2015
Computational study of critical moisture and depth of burn in peat fires 
Xinyan Huang and Guillermo Rein

We develop a computational model to investigate the spread of smouldering fires into peat columns with heterogeneous property profiles. Modelling results reveal that the critical moisture for extinction can be much higher than previously reported values for ignition, thus helping to understand the role of moisture in peat fires.

blank image
   |        Open Access Article
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 28 July 2015
Is aridity a high-order control on the hydro–geomorphic response of burned landscapes? 
Gary J. Sheridan, Petter Nyman, Christoph Langhans, Jane Cawson, Philip J. Noske, Akiko Oono, Rene Van der Sant and Patrick N. J. Lane

The runoff and sediment generation potential of fire-affected soils is a critical factor in determining the hydro–geomorphic response of burned landscapes. Aridity is a control on soil development, and here we show it is also a strong predictor of post-fire surface runoff generation and high-magnitude erosion processes such as debris flows.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 28 July 2015
Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption – RxCADRE 2011 and 2012 
Andrew T. Hudak, Matthew B. Dickinson, Benjamin C. Bright, Robert L. Kremens, E. Louise Loudermilk, Joseph J. O'Brien, Benjamin S. Hornsby and Roger D. Ottmar

We present ground-based and remotely sensed data used to predict surface fuel loads and fire radiative energy density (FRED) from the 2011 and 2012 RxCADRE prescribed fires. Relationships between observed and predicted surface fuel loads, and fuel consumption observed and predicted from FRED, approached linearity at multiple scales.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 27 July 2015
A method for estimating the amount of dead grass fuel based on spectral reflectance characteristics 
Zhang Zhengxiang, Zhang Hongyan, Feng Zhiqiang, Li Xuedong, Bi Yunzhi, Shi Dongkai, Zhou Daowei, Wang Yong, and Zhao Jianjun

This study uses spectral measurements to examine the reflectance characteristics associated with cellulose and lignin near 2100 nm and develops an index for dead grass fuel. We found that the regression functions based on the dead grass fuel index can be applied to estimate the amount of dead grass fuels.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 16 July 2015
Climate change presents increased potential for very large fires in the contiguous United States 
R. Barbero, J. T. Abatzoglou, N. K. Larkin, C. A. Kolden and B. Stocks

Very large fires (VLFs) have important implications for ecosystems, air quality and fire suppression expenditures. Climate change projections suggest an increase in conditions conducive to VLF potential across most historically fire-prone regions of the US as well as changes in the seasonality of such conditions.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 13 July 2015
Effects of curing on grassfires: I. Fuel dynamics in a senescing grassland 
Susan Kidnie, Miguel G. Cruz, Jim Gould, David Nichols, Wendy Anderson and Rachel Bessell

In this study we examined the dynamics of senescing grass fuels in relation to the proportion of live and dead fuels and their associated moisture content. We developed models aimed at quantifying the proportion of green and senescing fuels from knowledge of the proportion of dead fuel, and actual curing values from visual assessment estimates.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 13 July 2015
Effects of curing on grassfires: II. Effect of grass senescence on the rate of fire spread 
Miguel G. Cruz, Jim S. Gould, Susan Kidnie, Rachel Bessell, David Nichols and Alen Slijepcevic

We conducted a field-based experimental burning program to study the effect of grass senescence and live fuel moisture on the spread rate of a fire. Curing level was found to be the best descriptor of the damping effect of live fuels in the spread rate of grassfires. A model for this effect is proposed.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 09 July 2015
Relationships among wildfire, prescribed fire, and drought in a fire-prone landscape in the south-eastern United States 
Robert N. Addington, Stephen J. Hudson, J. Kevin Hiers, Matthew D. Hurteau, Thomas F. Hutcherson, George Matusick and James M. Parker

We evaluated relationships among wildfire, prescribed fire and drought over a 30-year period at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. Prescribed fire has been effective in reducing annual wildfire incidence over time. Wildfire incidence and areal extent were highest during drought years when the cumulative area treated by prescribed fire was low.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 09 July 2015
Experimental analysis of fire spread across a two-dimensional ridge under wind conditions 
J. R. Raposo, S. Cabiddu, D. X. Viegas, M. Salis and J. Sharples

Fires propagating on a two-dimensional hill with wind perpendicular to the ridgeline can spread laterally owing to flow separation and develop a much wider fire front on the lee face of the hill. Experimental results at laboratory scale and field observations are reported to illustrate and model this phenomenon.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 09 July 2015
The economic benefit of localised, short-term, wildfire-potential information 
Laine Christman and Kimberly Rollins

We develop a method to value wildfire-potential information as a fire suppression decision-support tool. We demonstrate the method by calculating expected suppression expenditures for ‘with’ and ‘without’ information cases for a hypothetical management unit. The value of this information is defined as the difference in expected wildfire suppression expenditures.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 09 July 2015
Carbon footprint from helitankers: sustainable decision making in aerial wildfire fighting 
Sergio Alvarez, Rosa Planelles and Agustín Rubio

Air transport sector and wildfires are considered relevant contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. We calculate the carbon footprint from a company owning 20 helitankers. We discuss the influence of the method, its implications and future actions for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Our experience provides a useful pilot study.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 07 July 2015
Risk assessment of post-wildfire hydrological response in semiarid basins: the effects of varying rainfall representations in the KINEROS2/AGWA model 
Gabriel Sidman, D. Phillip Guertin, David C. Goodrich, Carl L. Unkrich and I. Shea Burns

The KINEROS2/AGWA model was used to compare several representations of post-fire rainfall events. Results indicated that radar depictions produced more accurate absolute runoff values than design storm depictions. However, risk assessment predictions of relative change between pre- and post-fire scenarios did not vary greatly between rainfall depictions.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 07 July 2015
Structural and functional connectivity as a driver of hillslope erosion following disturbance 
C. Jason Williams, Frederick B. Pierson, Peter R. Robichaud, Osama Z. Al-Hamdan, Jan Boll and Eva K. Strand

This study quantifies runoff and erosion across point to hillslope scales and evaluates connectivity of runoff and erosion processes for fragmented and burnt landscapes. The results clearly demonstrate hillslope hydrologic response is governed by water input and the connectivity of surface susceptibility, sediment availability, and runoff and erosion processes.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 02 July 2015
Sources and implications of bias and uncertainty in a century of US wildfire activity data 
Karen C. Short

Data for US wildfire activity analyses are typically acquired from archival summary reports of the federal or interagency fire organisations; incident-level wildfire reporting systems of the federal, state and local fire services; and, increasingly, remote-sensing programs. This paper provides an overview of these sources and highlights major reporting biases, inconsistencies and uncertainty within each.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 23 June 2015
Post-wildfire soil and plant foliar nutrient ratios and soil fungi : bacterial ratios in alpine meadows on the southeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 
Lin Zhang, Lijuan Liu, Kaiwen Pan, Wei Li, Yanjie Wang, Mingrui Deng, Jiguo Xia and Xu Yang

We explored post-wildfire nutrient ratios of soil and dominant plant species leaves and soil fungi : bacterial ratios in alpine meadows on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results indicated that wildfire reduces the supply capacity of nitrogen for plants relative to phosphorus and potassium in soils, and affects micro-organism composition by the change of multiple nutrient ratios.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 22 June 2015
Relationships between fire danger and the daily number and daily growth of active incidents burning in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA 
Patrick H. Freeborn, Mark A. Cochrane and W. Matt Jolly

Associating daily National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) indices with daily metrics of ongoing fire activity reveals that as fire danger increases there is a corresponding but seasonally dependent increase in both the average and variability in the daily number and daily growth of active incidents burning in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 22 June 2015
High-resolution infrared thermography for capturing wildland fire behaviour: RxCADRE 2012 
Joseph J. O'Brien, E. Louise Loudermilk, Benjamin Hornsby, Andrew T. Hudak, Benjamin C. Bright, Matthew B. Dickinson, J. Kevin Hiers, Casey Teske and Roger D. Ottmar

Herein we describe the usefulness of long-wave infrared (LWIR) imagery for capturing fire behaviour in space and time. We explore how images captured at different perspectives and varying spatial resolutions affect measurements of fire. We discuss of the usefulness of multiple measurements and potential in quantifying fire patterns of fire spread and fire effects.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 15 June 2015
Modelling static fire hazard in a semi-arid region using frequency analysis 
Hamed Adab, Kasturi Devi Kanniah, Karim Solaimani and Roselina Sallehuddin

Fire is a common hazard in forested areas in arid and semi-arid regions. This study presents a static fire hazard model to identify the locations in north-eastern Iran that are prone to fire hazard. The results show that approximately 14% of Golestan Province in Iran is subject to ≥66% fire hazard level.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 12 June 2015
Operational wildfire suppression modelling: a review evaluating development, state of the art and future directions 
Thomas J. Duff and Kevin G. Tolhurst

An efficient suppression response has been demonstrated to reduce the size and subsequent impacts of wildfires. This has stimulated the development of fire suppression models that form part of decision support systems. We review the historic development of such models, assess the state of the art and provide perspectives on future research.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 11 June 2015
Techniques for evaluating wildfire simulators via the simulation of historical fires using the Australis simulator 
Joel K. Kelso, Drew Mellor, Mary E. Murphy and George J. Milne

A technique for validating wildfire simulators using historical fire data is presented. The technique was applied to a large wildfire occurring in Western Australian sand-plain heathlands. Historical fire spread was compared with that produced by the Australis simulator. Issues regarding the quality of data available for simulator evaluation are discussed.

blank image
 
  ustralis simulator&title=International Journal of Wildland Fire&date=9999&volume=9999&spage=&epage=&aulast=Kelso&aufirst=Joel K." target="_blank" >
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 04 June 2015
Effect of fire prevention programs on accidental and incendiary wildfires on tribal lands in the United States 
Karen L. Abt, David T. Butry, Jeffrey P. Prestemon and Samuel Scranton

New prevention programs were shown to reduce the number of human-caused wildfires for selected US tribal lands. Prevention reduced wildfires caused by children, equipment, escaped campfires and fire-use, but did not reduce smoking- or arson-caused wildfires. Average benefits exceeded average costs for the programs we examined.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 04 June 2015
Dormant season grazing may decrease wildfire probability by increasing fuel moisture and reducing fuel amount and continuity 
Kirk W. Davies, Chad S. Boyd, Jon D. Bates and April Hulet

We evaluated the effects of winter grazing on fuels in rangelands. Winter grazing compared with no grazing decreased fine fuels and increased fuel moisture content without increasing exotic annuals or negatively impacting native plants. The cumulative effect of winter grazing on fuels reduces wildfire risk and potential severity.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 04 June 2015
Too hot to trot? Evaluating the effects of wildfire on patterns of occupancy and abundance for a climate-sensitive habitat specialist 
Johanna Varner, Mallory S. Lambert, Joshua J. Horns, Sean Laverty, Laurie Dizney, Erik A. Beever and M. Denise Dearing

We investigated the effects of fire on a climate-sensitive mammal, namely the American pika. Despite loss of canopy cover and understorey vegetation as a result of the fire, pikas were widely distributed and abundant after the fire. The fire did not alter microclimates relevant to pikas, highlighting the value of talus as a thermal refuge.

blank image
 
    | Supplementary Material (225 KB)
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 01 June 2015
Local environmental covariates are important for predicting fire history from tree stem diameters 
J. Lazzari, H. J. Yoon, D. A. Keith and D. A. Driscoll

The frequent lack of recorded fire history means it is important to develop surrogates such as stem diameter to estimate time since fire. Even though stem diameter accounted for the greatest proportion of the explained variation in growth, local environmental influences on stem growth were important for estimating time since the last fire.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 18 May 2015
Leaf flammability and fuel load increase under elevated CO2 levels in a model grassland 
Anthony Manea, Saskia Grootemaat and Michelle R. Leishman

We tested the effect of CO2 level and soil P availability on leaf flammability and fuel load accumulation in plant species from Cumberland Plain Woodland, western Sydney. The results showed that leaf flammability and fuel load accumulation increased under elevated CO2 levels whereas soil P availability had no effect.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 15 May 2015
Contemporary fire regime risks to key ecological assets and processes in north Australian savannas 
Andrew Edwards, Jeremy Russell-Smith and Mick Meyer

Models describing fire effects on water, soil and biodiversity were applied across the north Australian tropical savannas using recent fire mapping. An existing improved fire management example, and the published effects of climate change, were modelled and indicated that improved management, even with the effects of climate change, is better.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 14 May 2015
Growth and reproductive post-fire responses of two shrubs in semiarid Patagonian grasslands 
S. L. Gonzalez, L. Ghermandi and D. V. Peláez

We studied the effect of fire temperatures on the survival, regrowth and reproduction of Senecio bracteolatus and Mulinum spinosum shrubs in Patagonian grasslands. High-temperature fire decreased survival and growth of S. bracteolatus plants, whereas low-temperature fire enhanced early seed production. Mulinum spinosum plants survived at high temperatures but delayed seed production.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 11 May 2015
Toward an integrated system for fire, smoke and air quality simulations 
Adam K. Kochanski, Mary Ann Jenkins, Kara Yedinak, Jan Mandel, Jonathan Beezley and Brian Lamb

This study presents and tests an integrated wildfire smoke prediction system formed by coupling WRF-Sfire, a weather research forecast system plus surface fire behaviour model, with the chemical transport model WRF-Chem. The coupled WRF-Sfire-Chem aims to predict pyro-plume development, and smoke dispersion and its air quality impacts, by comprehensively modelling fire spread, heat release during flaming combustion, fire emissions and fire plume rise, as well as downwind smoke dispersion and associated chemistry.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 27 April 2015
A coupled modelling approach to assess the effect of fuel treatments on post-wildfire runoff and erosion 
Gabriel Sidman, D. Phillip Guertin, David C. Goodrich, David Thoma, Donald Falk and I. Shea Burns

Assessing the effectiveness of fuel treatments on reducing post-fire hydrologic response is an important challenge in fire management. We linked fuel treatment, wildfire and hydrological models spatially to measure the effects of fuel treatments on post-fire runoff and erosion in two case studies on National Park Service lands.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 02 April 2015
Post-wildfire debris flows in southern British Columbia, Canada 
Peter Jordan

Post-wildfire debris flows have occurred as a result of several severe wildfires in the southern interior of British Columbia since 2003. Such events can present a significant hazard to public safety and infrastructure below burned areas. Debris flows have been triggered by spring snowmelt, high-intensity summer rain and long-duration fall rain.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image

 
Published online 24 March 2015
Relations between soil hydraulic properties and burn severity 
John A. Moody, Brian A. Ebel, Petter Nyman, Deborah A. Martin, Cathelijne Stoof and Randy McKinley

Remote sensing is being widely used to detect landscape changes caused by wildfire and to provide detailed information for models. Our results show that remote sensing measures of these changes can be related to changes in soil properties that affect runoff. These relations will improve predictions of catastrophic floods from burned areas.

blank image
 
  
blank image

blank image blank image blank image


blank image International Journal of Wildland Fire
Volume 24 Number 5 2015

 
Subscriber Login
Username:
Password:  

 
 
Anthropogenic effects on global mean fire size 
blank image
Stijn Hantson , Gitta Lasslop , Silvia Kloster and Emilio Chuvieco
pp. 589-596

Humans have an important effect on fire size, but this has so far not been well quantified at a global scale. Here we describe a linear negative relationship between mean fire size and population density over the globe. We use this information to improve the global fire model SPITFIRE–JSBACH.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
An empirical wildfire risk analysis: the probability of a fire spreading to the urban interface in Sydney, Australia 
blank image
Owen Price , Rittick Borah , Ross Bradstock and Trent Penman
pp. 597-606

We developed a statistical model to predict whether random points on the urban interface were burnt by a sample of 677 past wildfires. The model had 98% accuracy and shows promise for predicting and mapping wildfire risk. Fire weather, the extent of forest, distance and time-since-fire were important predictors.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
The influence of ignition technique on fire behaviour in spinifex open woodland in semiarid northern Australia 
blank image
Paul R. Williams , Eleanor M. Collins , Mick Blackman , Clare Blackman , Jackie McLeod , Leasie Felderhof , Lauren Colless , Kate Masters , Simon Coates , Andrew Sturgess and Graeme Martin
pp. 607-612

Managed fires using spot ignition in spinifex open woodland of northern Australia can produce a more patchily burnt landscape, with less canopy severity than wildfires. The high severity of wildfires appears strongly influenced by fire front length, irrespective of fire season.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Fuel dynamics and vegetation recovery after fire in a semiarid Australian shrubland 
blank image
Sarah A. Dalgleish , Eddie J. B. van Etten , William D. Stock and Chris Knuckey
pp. 613-623

We showed that shrubland fuel levels in semiarid Australia gradually accumulated for many decades following burning due to increases in shrub size and density, and buildup of dead plant material. This suggests that fire hazard will also increase over such time frames and that prescribed burning may help reduce this threat.

 
    | Supplementary Material (1002 KB)
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Interactions of fires of neighbouring shrubs in two- and three-shrub arrangements 
blank image
Ambarish Dahale , Babak Shotorban and Shankar Mahalingam
pp. 624-639

Interactions of shrub fires were studied by physics-based modelling. Peak mass-loss rate and vertical fire spread rate were found to be larger for cases with a smaller separation distance between the shrubs. Generation of strong vorticity by higher gravitational torque appeared to be the cause of enhanced burning in the three-shrub arrangement.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Incorporating vegetation attenuation in radiant heat flux modelling 
blank image
Glenn Newnham , Raphaele Blanchi , Kimberley Opie , Justin Leonard and Anders Siggins
pp. 640-649

We present a model of radiant heat incident on homes affected by wildfire. The model uses spatial information describing topography and arrangement of vegetation in the near vicinity. The attenuating influence of fuels that lie between the flame and the building are included in the calculation and their significance evaluated.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Driving factors of fire density can spatially vary at the local scale in south-eastern France 
blank image
Anne Ganteaume and Marlène Long-Fournel
pp. 650-664

Spatial relationships between fire density and biophysical and human-related factors were found in in a south-eastern France study, pointing to wildland–urban interface as the principal driver of fire density; but at a smaller scale, some of these factors spatially varied. A better understanding of their influence on fire density will help to improve fire prevention at a fine scale.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Integrating forest fuels and land cover data for improved estimation of fuel consumption and carbon emissions from boreal fires 
blank image
Kerry Anderson , Brian Simpson , Ronald J. Hall , Peter Englefield , Michael Gartrell and Juha M. Metsaranta
pp. 665-679

The potential of spatial fuel maps to improve estimation of wildland fire carbon emissions in Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System was evaluated. The use of spatial fuel maps was found to increase the precision of estimated total carbon emissions for select wildfires in western Canada.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Fire history of a mixed conifer forest on the Mogollon Rim, northern Arizona, USA 
blank image
David W. Huffman , Thomas J. Zegler and Peter Z. Fulé
pp. 680-689

We reconstructed fire regime characteristics of a mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Arizona and analysed composite fire intervals, point fire intervals, natural fire rotation, landscape characteristics and forest age structure. Results showed that the historical fire regime on this landscape was one of high-frequency, low-severity fires.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Bird diversity increases after patchy prescribed fire: implications from a before–after control–impact study 
blank image
Holly Sitters , Julian Di Stefano , Fiona J. Christie , Paul Sunnucks and Alan York
pp. 690-701

We investigated avian responses to patchy, low-severity prescribed fire at two spatial scales. Prescribed fire increased bird diversity at finer spatial scales and allowed persistence of species detected in pre-fire surveys. We recommend formal incorporation of patchiness into prescribed burning for ecologically sensitive fire management.

 
    | Supplementary Material (353 KB)
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Long-term effects of a wildfire on the soil nematode communities in the spruce forest ecosystem of High Tatra National Park 
blank image
Marek Renčo and Andrea Čerevková
pp. 702-711

The paper presents analysis of the soil nematode communities as indicators of soil conditions 8 years after a wildfire in the spruce forest ecosystem. Results indicate that the soil ecosystem had recovered by this time.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Small mammals decline with increasing fire extent in northern Australia: evidence from long-term monitoring in Kakadu National Park 
blank image
Michael J. Lawes , Brett P. Murphy , Alaric Fisher , John C. Z. Woinarski , Andrew C. Edwards and Jeremy Russell-Smith
pp. 712-722

We compared the effect of fire extent, fire frequency, season and spatial heterogeneity (patchiness) of the burnt area on mammal declines in Kakadu National Park over a recent decadal period. Fire extent was the most important aspect of fire regimes associated with declines. Small mammals appear most affected by extensive (at scales larger than the home ranges of small mammals) and less patchy fires.

 
    | Supplementary Material (131 KB)
 

blank image blank image blank image

 
Modelling and mitigating dose to firefighters from inhalation of radionuclides in wildland fire smoke 
blank image
Brian J. Viner , Tim Jannik , Daniel Stone , Allan Hepworth , Luke Naeher , Olorunfemi Adetona , John Blake and Teresa Eddy
pp. 723-733

Fires in radiological contaminated areas may expose firefighters to airborne radioactive material. Modelling fuel conditions and smoke dispersion for a range of case studies showed regulatory dose limits were not exceeded in most cases. Consideration of plume rise further reduced the predicted dose. Our approach can be applied to a range of burn scenarios.

 
  
 

blank image blank image blank image

   
These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    WF15090  Accepted 30 July 2015
    Measuring radiant emissions from entire prescribed fires with ground, airborne, and satellite sensors - RxCADRE 2012
    Matthew Dickinson, Andrew Hudak, Thomas Zajkowski, Eva (Louise) Loudermilk, Wilfrid Schroeder, Luke Ellison, Robert Kremens, William Holley, Otto Martinez, Alexander Paxton, Benjamin Bright, Joseph OBrien, Benjamin Hornsby, Charles Ichoku, Jason Faulring, Aaron Gerace, David Peterson, Joseph Mauceri
    Abstract


    WF14176  Accepted 30 July 2015
    Evaluation and use of remotely-piloted aircraft systems for operations and research—RxCADRE 2012
    Thomas Zajkowski, Matthew Dickinson, John Hiers, William Holley, Brett Williams, Alexander Paxton, Otto Martinez, Gregory Walker
    Abstract


    WF15082  Accepted 28 July 2015
    Limitations and utilization of Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity products for assessing wildfire severity in the USA
    Crystal Kolden, Alistair Smith, John Abatzoglou
    Abstract


    WF15079  Accepted 28 July 2015
    Seasonal predictability of summer fires in a Mediterranean environment
    Raül Marcos, Marco Turco, Joaquín Bedía, Maria-Carmen Llasat, Antonello Provenzale
    Abstract


    WF14182  Accepted 27 July 2015
    The role of leaf traits in determining litter flammability of southeastern Amazon tree species
    Amoreena Parsons, Jennifer Balch, Rafael de Andrade, Paulo Brando
    Abstract


    WF15010  Accepted 16 July 2015
    Too much, too soon? A review of the impacts of increasing wildfire frequency on tree mortality and regeneration in temperate eucalypt forests
    Thomas Fairman, Craig Nitschke, Lauren Bennett
    Abstract


    WF14214  Accepted 16 July 2015
    Characterization of the fuel and fire environment in Southern Ontario’s tallgrass prairie
    Susan Kidnie, B Wotton
    Abstract


    WF14154  Accepted 16 July 2015
    Observations of Energy Transport and Spread Rates from Low Intensity Fires in Longleaf Pine Habitat— RxCADRE 2012
    Bret Butler, Casey Teske, Daniel Jimenez, Joseph OBrien, Paul Sopko, Cyle Wold, Mark Vosburgh, Benjamin Hornsby, Eva (Louise) Loudermilk
    Abstract


    WF14078  Accepted 16 July 2015
    Structure-level fuel load assessment in the wildland-urban interface: a fusion of airborne laser scanning and spectral remote sensing methodologies
    Nicholas Skowronski, Scott Haag, Jim Trimble, Kenneth Clark, Michael Gallagher, Richard Lathrop
    Abstract


    WF14221  Accepted 12 July 2015
    Accelerated weathering of carbonate rocks following the 2010 wildfire on Mt. Carmel, Israel
    Nurit Shtober-Zisu, Naama Tessler, Alexander Tsatskin, Noam Greenbaum
    Abstract


    WF15059  Accepted 30 June 2015
    Fire severity estimation from space: A comparison of active and passive sensors and their synergy for different forest types
    Mihai Andrei Tanase, Robert Kennedy, Cristina Aponte
    Abstract


    WF15031  Accepted 30 June 2015
    Long-distance spotting potential of bark strips of a ribbon gum - Eucalyptus viminalis
    James Hall, Peter Ellis, Geoff Cary, Glenys Bishop, Andrew Sullivan
    Abstract


    WF14167  Accepted 28 June 2015
    Fire in Arctic Tundra of Alaska: Past fire activity, future fire potential, and significance for land management and ecology
    Nancy French, Liza Jenkins, Tatiana Loboda, Mike Flannigan, Randi Jandt, Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, Matthew Whitley
    Abstract


    WF15034  Accepted 25 June 2015
    Wildfire smoke and public health risk
    Fabienne Reisen, Sandra Durán, Mike Flannigan, Catherine Elliot, Karen Rideout
    Abstract


    WF14155  Accepted 25 June 2015
    Re-analysis of wind and slope effects on flame characteristics of Mediterranean shrub fires
    Ralph Nelson
    Abstract


    WF15052  Accepted 13 June 2015
    Influence of wind speed on the global variability of burned fraction: a global fire model’s perspective
    Gitta Lasslop, Stijn Hantson, Silvia Kloster
    Abstract


    WF15055  Accepted 16 May 2015
    Winter grazing can reduce wildfire size, intensity, and behavior in a shrub-grassland
    Kirk Davies, Chad Boyd, Jon Bates, April Hulet
    Abstract


    WF14085  Accepted 23 March 2015
    Data assimilation of dead fuel moisture observations from remote automated weather stations
    Martin Vejmelka, Adam Kochanski, Jan Mandel
    Abstract


    WF13206  Accepted 20 March 2014
    An accuracy assessment of the MTBS burned area product for shrub-steppe fires in the northern Great Basin, United States
    Aaron Sparks, Luigi Boschetti, Wade Tinkham, Alistair Smith, Karen Lannom, Beth Newingham
    Abstract


19


The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 23 October 2014
Effect of fire on small mammals: a systematic review

Anthony D. Griffiths and Barry W. Brook

2. Published 5 December 2014
Challenges of assessing fire and burn severity using field measures, remote sensing and modelling

Penelope Morgan, Robert E. Keane, Gregory K. Dillon, Theresa B. Jain, Andrew T. Hudak, Eva C. Karau, Pamela G. Sikkink, Zachary A. Holden and Eva K. Strand

3. Published 23 October 2014
Climate and very large wildland fires in the contiguous western USA

E. Natasha Stavros, John Abatzoglou, Narasimhan K. Larkin, Donald McKenzie and E. Ashley Steel

4. Published 5 December 2014
The role of defensible space for residential structure protection during wildfires

Alexandra D. Syphard, Teresa J. Brennan and Jon E. Keeley

5. Published 4 June 2015
A generic, empirical-based model for predicting rate of fire spread in shrublands

Wendy R. Anderson, Miguel G. Cruz, Paulo M. Fernandes, Lachlan McCaw, Jose Antonio Vega, Ross A. Bradstock, Liam Fogarty, Jim Gould, Greg McCarthy, Jon B. Marsden-Smedley, Stuart Matthews, Greg Mattingley, H. Grant Pearce and Brian W. van Wilgen

6. Published 1 August 2014
Advances in remote sensing and GIS applications in support of forest fire management

Ioannis Z. Gitas, Jesús San-Miguel-Ayanz, Emilio Chuvieco and Andrea Camia

7. Published 23 October 2014
Managing burned landscapes: evaluating future management strategies for resilient forests under a warming climate

K. L. Shive, P. Z. Fulé, C. H. Sieg, B. A. Strom and M. E. Hunter

8. Published 18 March 2015
Social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in the 21st century and future research needs

Amy Christianson

9. Published 10 September 2014
Fuel reduction burning mitigates wildfire effects on forest carbon and greenhouse gas emission

Liubov Volkova, C. P. Mick Meyer, Simon Murphy, Thomas Fairman, Fabienne Reisen and Christopher Weston

10. Published 1 August 2014
Integrating geospatial information into fire risk assessment

E. Chuvieco, I. Aguado, S. Jurdao, M. L. Pettinari, M. Yebra, J. Salas, S. Hantson, J. de la Riva, P. Ibarra, M. Rodrigues, M. Echeverría, D. Azqueta, M. V. Román, A. Bastarrika, S. Martínez, C. Recondo, E. Zapico and F. J. Martínez-Vega

11. Published 5 February 2015
Location, timing and extent of wildfire vary by cause of ignition

Alexandra D. Syphard and Jon E. Keeley

12. Published 1 August 2014
Mapping the daily progression of large wildland fires using MODIS active fire data

Sander Veraverbeke, Fernando Sedano, Simon J. Hook, James T. Randerson, Yufang Jin and Brendan M. Rogers

13. Published 10 September 2014
Simulation and thermal imaging of the 2006 Esperanza Wildfire in southern California: application of a coupled weather–wildland fire model

Janice L. Coen and Philip J. Riggan

14. Published 5 February 2015
Does fire limit tree biomass in Australian savannas?

Brett P. Murphy, Adam C. Liedloff and Garry D. Cook

15. Published 10 September 2014
Biomass and litter accumulation patterns in species-rich shrublands for fire hazard assessment

V. C. Westcott, N. J. Enright, B. P. Miller, J. B. Fontaine, J. C. Lade and B. B. Lamont

16. Published 23 October 2014
A synthesis of post-fire Burned Area Reports from 1972 to 2009 for western US Forest Service lands: trends in wildfire characteristics and post-fire stabilisation treatments and expenditures

Peter R. Robichaud, Hakjun Rhee and Sarah A. Lewis

17. Published 10 September 2014
Preparing ... for what? Developing multi-dimensional measures of community wildfire preparedness for researchers, practitioners and households

Patrick D. Dunlop, Ilona M. McNeill, Jessica L. Boylan, David L. Morrison and Timothy C. Skinner

18. Published 5 February 2015
Correlations between components of the water balance and burned area reveal new insights for predicting forest fire area in the southwest United States

A. Park Williams, Richard Seager, Alison K. Macalady, Max Berkelhammer, Michael A. Crimmins, Thomas W. Swetnam, Anna T. Trugman, Nikolaus Buenning, David Noone, Nate G. McDowell, Natalia Hryniw, Claudia I. Mora and Thom Rahn

19. Published 1 August 2014
Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American lands

Amanda B. Stan, Peter Z. Fulé, Kathryn B. Ireland and Jamie S. Sanderlin

20. Published 11 May 2015
Global patterns in fire leverage: the response of annual area burnt to previous fire

Owen F. Price, Juli G. Pausas, Navashni Govender, Mike Flannigan, Paulo M. Fernandes, Mathew L. Brooks and Rebecca Bliege Bird


      
Current Issue
Journal Cover
Volume 24 (5)

red arrow Submit Article
blank image
Use the online submission system to send us your paper.

red arrow IJWF Content Free to IAWF Members
blank image
All journal content can be accessed by IAWF members through the IAWF Members-Only site.

 Advertisement


   
Legal & Privacy | Contact Us | Help

CSIRO

© CSIRO 1996-2015