Marine and Freshwater Research Marine and Freshwater Research Society
Advances in the aquatic sciences
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Optimising the design of large-scale acoustic telemetry curtains

Andre Steckenreuter A J , Xavier Hoenner B , Charlie Huveneers C , Colin Simpfendorfer D , Marie J. Buscot E , Katherine Tattersall B , Russell Babcock F , Michelle Heupel G , Mark Meekan G , James van den Broek A , Phillip McDowall A , Vic Peddemors H and Robert Harcourt A I
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Integrated Marine Observing System, Animal Tracking Facility, Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Mosman, NSW 2088, Australia.

B Integrated Marine Observing System, eMarine Information Infrastructure, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia.

C School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia.

D Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture & College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.

E Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia.

F CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia.

G Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Qld 4810, Australia.

H New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Mosman, NSW 2088, Australia.

I Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia.

J Corresponding author. Email: andre.steckenreuter@sims.org.au

Marine and Freshwater Research 68(8) 1403-1413 https://doi.org/10.1071/MF16126
Submitted: 8 April 2016  Accepted: 6 October 2016   Published: 30 November 2016

Abstract

Broad-scale acoustic telemetry networks are being established worldwide. The 10-year anniversary of the Integrated Marine Observing System’s Animal Tracking Facility provided the opportunity to assess the efficiency of one of the first national-scale acoustic telemetry networks. Acoustic networks are comprised of acoustic receiver arrays that detect high-frequency transmitters attached to animals that pass within detection range. Herein we assessed the efficiency of eight curtains to detect passing animals by calculating the standardised mean number of detections and transmitters detected at each station. The aim was to determine how many receivers could be decommissioned from each curtain while maintaining its integrity (i.e. detection of all species passing the array). Pivotal locations were defined as the furthest station at which all species would still be detected and where at least 75% of the detections and transmitters would still be detected. By applying these criteria, we were able to improve the cost-effectiveness of our network significantly, reducing the number of stations from 132 to 85 (64% of the original network), yet still retaining 84% of total detections, 86% of transmitters and 100% of detected species. The present study provides a useful framework for refining acoustic telemetry networks.

Additional keywords: acoustic network, acoustic tracking, detection efficiency, Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), animal tracking, VEMCO.


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