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  Rangeland Ecology & Management
 
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The Rangeland Journal publishes original work on the biophysical, social, cultural, economic, and policy influences affecting rangeland use and management. More

Editor-in-Chief: John Milne

 
 
 

blank image The Rangeland Journal
Volume 37 Number 4 2015

 
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Climate change and adaptive capacity in the Western Australian rangelands: a review of current institutional responses 
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Ellena Shaw and G. Bradd Witt
pp. 331-344

This study evaluated support for adaptive capacity in Western Australian rangelands. Eight indicators of adaptive capacity were used to evaluate publicly available documents. Progress towards adaptive capacity was classified as ‘aspirational’, ‘in action’ or ‘assessed’. Institutional support for adaptive capacity was evident. However, questions, such as whether the largely aspirational nature of documents reflect actual adaptation, and the extent to which stakeholders perceive that institutional support exists remain unanswered.

 
  
 

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Exploring appropriate livelihood alternatives for sustainable rangeland management 
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Hojatollah Khedri Gharibvand , Hossein Azadi and Frank Witlox
pp. 345-356

Rangeland degradation and vulnerability of livelihoods are two major challenges faced by rangeland managers and policy-makers in arid and semiarid regions. Through a comprehensive literature review, this paper argues that sustainable rangeland management cannot be achieved if sustainable livelihoods of rangeland users are neglected. As a result, to achieve sustainable rangeland management, we introduced a set of appropriate livelihood alternatives and drew a framework for their evaluation.

 
 

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Interactions between wildlife, humans and cattle: activity patterns of a remnant population of impala on the degraded Mutara Rangelands, Rwanda 
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T. Wronski , J. D. Bariyanga , A. Apio and M. Plath
pp. 357-365

African ungulates are often studied in conservation areas, but rangelands are nowadays impacted by agriculture and pastoralism. This study reports on a remnant impala population on degraded rangelands in Rwanda. Compared with an undisturbed population, marked changes in daytime activity were observed. This was not correlated with human activity. Hunting and cattle presence led to loss of daytime rhythmicity. The study highlights impalas’ behavioural flexibility and adaptability to habitat alterations.

 
  
 

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The population dynamics of some arid zone plants during 46 years of grazing on Mileura Station, Western Australia 
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S. J. J. F. Davies , S. A. Kenny and T. F. M. Walsh
pp. 367-377

The population dynamics of some perennial arid zone plants were studied over 46 years on Mileura Station, Western Australia. Individual plants were counted in permanent quadrats, which had been grazed by livestock and wildlife, in two separate land systems in 1967, 1976, 1990 and 2013. The results demonstrated that regeneration of many perennial species can occur under commercial grazing conditions and without the exclusion of kangaroos, goats, rabbits and other grazing animals, but regeneration is slow.

 
  
 

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Quantifying carbon sequestration on sheep grazing land in Australia for life cycle assessment studies 
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B. K. Henry , D. Butler and S. G. Wiedemann
pp. 379-388

Carbon sequestration in reforestation, revegetation and pasture soils in Australian wool-producing regions was quantified in a life cycle assessment study using a combination of case-study farm and regional survey data. Enhanced woody vegetation and pasture management were estimated to offset greenhouse gas emissions per kilogram of greasy wool by 2–10% providing potential additional value to the productivity and agro-ecosystem benefits of shelterbelt trees, browse shrubs or improved pasture soils.

 
  
 

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Effects of grazing by large herbivores on plant diversity and productivity of semi-arid alpine steppe on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau 
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Hasbagan Ganjurjav , Min-jie Duan , Yun-fan Wan , Wei-na Zhang , Qing-zhu Gao , Yue Li , Wang-zha Jiangcun , Luo-bu Danjiu and Hong-bao Guo
pp. 389-397

A 5-year sheep grazing experiment was conducted on a semi-arid grassland on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The results showed that, after 5 years of grazing, the grassland productivity decreased significantly under all grazing treatments compared with the no grazing control treatment, whereas plant diversity increased under the low and moderate grazing treatments. The changes in plant diversity and productivity were mainly derived from changes in plant community composition under grazing.

 
  
 

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The effects of a moratorium on land-clearing in the Douglas-Daly region, Northern Territory, Australia 
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M. J. Lawes , R. Greiner , I. A. Leiper , R. Ninnis , D. Pearson and G. Boggs
pp. 399-408

A moratorium promulgated in 2003 failed to effectively regulate land-clearing for agricultural development in the Douglas-Daly catchment. The moratorium was not the subject of legislation and was based on broad principles of environmental management, causing uncertainty that consequently promoted clearing. Accordingly, the policy did not adequately serve the aims of the moratorium and reinforces the principle that policy is only as good as its level of implementation.

 
  
 

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Preventing weed spread: a survey of lifestyle and commercial landholders about Nassella trichotoma in the Northern Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia 
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A. Ruttledge , R. D. B. Whalley , I. Reeve , D. A. Backhouse and B. M. Sindel
pp. 409-423

Serrated tussock is a highly invasive grass with significant potential to spread in the Northern Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia. A survey of rural landholders in the region has revealed that many have not adopted a preventative approach towards managing this species, and are often unable to identify the grass – a problem that could prevent its early detection, particularly on rural lifestyle blocks.

 
  
 

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Use of simulations to enhance knowledge integration and livestock producers’ adaptation to variability in the climate in northern Uruguay 
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H. Morales Grosskopf , J. F. Tourrand , D. Bartaburu , F. Dieguez , P. Bommel , J. Corral , E. Montes , M. Pereira , E. Duarte and P. Hegedus
pp. 425-432

To improve the ability of livestock producers to adapt to climate variability, the past effects of droughts were modelled to understand the dynamics of droughts at the level of the production unit through the development of an interactive agent-based simulation model. With 82 livestock producers and development actors, outputs of simulations were explored in five workshops with 82 livestock farmers. In these workshops, both biophysical models and those related to farm management were recognised as valid, and the typologies used were identified as realistic.

 
  
 

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Published online 24 July 2015
Comparison of animal biodiversity in three livestock systems of open environments of the semi-arid Chaco of Argentina 
Sofia Marinaro and Ricardo H. Grau

Open habitats are a key component of the Chaco eco-region of Argentina, one of the most active frontiers of land-use changes. We compared animal communities of three livestock open systems, finding non-significant differences in terms of diversity but in the composition of bird communities. Natural grasslands had the highest number of bird and mammal indicator species. We highlight their conservation value and indicate that they should be explicitly targeted by conservation and land-use policies.

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    RJ15023  Accepted 20 August 2015
    Competition indices of three perennial grasses used to rehabilitate degraded semi-arid rangelands in Kenya
    Kevin Mganga, Nashon Musimba, Dickson Nyariki
    Abstract


    RJ15021  Accepted 19 August 2015
    The use of shadows in high spatial resolution, remotely sensed, imagery to estimate the height of individual Eucalyptus trees on undulating farm land
    Niva Verma, David Lamb
    Abstract


    RJ14101  Accepted 19 August 2014
    FOREWORD:- Fire - Carbon - Savanna special issue
    Tom Davison
    Abstract


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The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 15 May 2015
The relative impacts of grazing, fire and invasion by buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) on the floristic composition of a rangeland savanna ecosystem

Roderick J. Fensham, Jian Wang and Cameron Kilgour

2. Published 24 September 2014
How hot? How often? Getting the fire frequency and timing right for optimal management of woody cover and pasture composition in northern Australian grazed tropical savannas. Kidman Springs Fire Experiment 1993–2013

Robyn A. Cowley, Mark H. Hearnden, Karen E. Joyce, Miguel Tovar-Valencia, Trisha M. Cowley, Caroline L. Pettit and Rodd M. Dyer

3. Published 24 September 2014
Fire and carbon management in a diversified rangelands economy: research, policy and implementation challenges for northern Australia

Dionne Walsh, Jeremy Russell-Smith and Robyn Cowley

4. Published 28 October 2014
Resting pastures to improve land condition in northern Australia: guidelines based on the literature and simulation modelling

Joe C. Scanlan, John G. McIvor, Steven G. Bray, Robyn A. Cowley, Leigh P. Hunt, Lester I. Pahl, Neil D. MacLeod and Giselle L. Whish

5. Published 24 September 2014
Carbon projects and Indigenous land in northern Australia

Jeremy Dore, Christine Michael, Jeremy Russell-Smith, Maureen Tehan and Lisa Caripis

6. Published 24 September 2014
Fire patterns in north Australian savannas: extending the reach of incentives for savanna fire emissions abatement

Peter J. Whitehead, Jeremy Russell-Smith and Cameron Yates

7. Published 27 March 2015
A novel protocol for assessment of aboveground biomass in rangeland environments

Charity Mundava, Antonius G. T. Schut, Petra Helmholz, Richard Stovold, Graham Donald and David W. Lamb

8. Published 5 December 2014
Herders’ perception of climate change does not always fit with actual climate change

Xiliang Li, Zhen Wang, Xiangyang Hou, Zhiying Liu, Sarula, Yanting Yin, Yong Ding and Jing Hu

9. Published 24 September 2014
Impacts of fire on soil organic carbon stocks in a grazed semi-arid tropical Australian savanna: accounting for landscape variability

D. E. Allen, P. M. Bloesch, R. A. Cowley, T. G. Orton, J. E. Payne and R. C. Dalal

10. Published 5 December 2014
The response of grassland productivity, soil carbon content and soil respiration rates to different grazing regimes in a desert steppe in northern China

Xiangyang Hou, Zhen Wang, Schellenberg P. Michael, Lei Ji and Xiangjun Yun

11. Published 27 March 2015
The future of food production research in the rangelands: challenges and prospects for research investment, organisation and human resources

C. W. Roxburgh and J. E. Pratley

12. Published 5 December 2014
Effects of mowing regimes and climate variability on hay production of Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvelev grassland in northern China

Taogetao Baoyin, Frank Yonghong Li, Qinghai Bao, Hugjiltu Minggagud and Yankai Zhong

13. Published 24 September 2014
Opportunities for fire and carbon on pastoral properties in the savanna rangelands: perspectives from the Indigenous Land Corporation and the Northern Territory Cattlemen's Association

Nerissa Walton, Hilary Smith, Luke Bowen, Paul Mitchell, Emma Pethybridge, Tracey Hayes and Michael O'Ryan

14. Published 24 September 2014
Aboveground and belowground carbon dynamics in response to fire regimes in the grazed rangelands of northern Australia: initial results from field studies and modelling

L. P. Hunt

15. Published 5 December 2014
Climate changes during the past 31 years and their contribution to the changes in the productivity of rangeland vegetation in the Inner Mongolian typical steppe

Xinhong Wu, Peng Li, Chao Jiang, Pengtao Liu, Jing He and Xiangyang Hou

16. Published 24 July 2015
Climate change and adaptive capacity in the Western Australian rangelands: a review of current institutional responses

Ellena Shaw and G. Bradd Witt

17. Published 5 December 2014
Response of the annual biomass production of a typical steppe plant community to precipitation fluctuations

Zhen Wang, Qing Zhang, Xiaoping Xin, Yong Ding, Xiangyang Hou, Sarula, Xiliang Li, Haijun Chen, Yanting Yin, Jing Hu and Zhongling Liu

18. Published 5 December 2014
Assessment of vulnerability to climate change in the Inner Mongolia steppe at a county scale from 1980 to 2009

Tingting Yang, Peng Li, Xinhong Wu, Xiangyang Hou, Pengtao Liu and Guozheng Yao

19. Published 28 October 2014
The benefits of seed enrichment on sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) populations, after 17 years, in semi-arid Western Australia

Jonathan E. Brand, Benjamin Sawyer and David R. Evans

20. Published 5 December 2014
Evaluation of the livelihood vulnerability of pastoral households in Northern China to natural disasters and climate change

Wenqiang Ding, Weibo Ren, Ping Li, Xiangyang Hou, Xiaolong Sun, Xiliang Li, Jihong Xie and Yong Ding


      
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