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Protocols in ecological and environmental plant physiology

 
 

Functional Plant Biology publishes new and significant information on the functional biology of plants at all scales from the molecular through whole plant to community. More

Editor-in-Chief: Rana Munns

 
 
 

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Published online 22 April 2014
Physiological controls of the isotopic time lag between leaf assimilation and soil CO2 efflux 
Yann Salmon, Romain L. Barnard and Nina Buchmann

The dynamics of recently assimilated carbon are a key driver of the carbon budget of terrestrial ecosystems and of their response to global change. Our study shows that belowground transfer of photosynthates is related to plant physiological controls, which, unlike environmental controls, are still poorly characterised. Our study contributes to improve the understanding of the dynamics of carbon allocation and isotopic signatures in terrestrial ecosystems.

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Published online 22 April 2014
Evaluating the potential of a novel dual heat-pulse sensor to measure volumetric water use in grapevines under a range of flow conditions 
Kyle R. Pearsall, Larry E. Williams, Sean Castorani, Tim M. Bleby and Andrew J. McElrone

Accurate quantification of crop water use is needed for efficient irrigation management in dry growing regions. We evaluated how well a novel application of sap-flow sensor technology measures grapevine water use, and found that flow rates measured with these new sensors correlated well other methods of water use quantification. This technology has potential use in irrigation management and research settings.

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Published online 22 April 2014
Leaf shape influences spatial variation in photosynthetic function in Lomatia tinctoria 
Andrea Leigh, Ross Hill and Marilyn C. Ball

It is not yet known why leaf shape varies so widely among different plant species, but plant biologists suspect one reason might relate to different adaptations for optimal water delivery to and within leaves. This study showed that in response to extreme short-term water stress, photosynthetic function was more spatially uniform in broad-shaped leaves, despite the lower density of water conducting veins to support photosynthesis, relative to narrow-shaped leaves. These findings suggest that the spatial arrangement of veins alone is partially responsible for different stress responses in contrasting leaf shapes.

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Published online 11 April 2014
Genomics for drought resistance – getting down to earth 
Abraham Blum

This Perspective paper inquires why, after 20 years of extensive research into the genomics of drought resistance, there are hardly any transgenic genetically modified drought-resistant crop cultivar on the market to date. An important reason is that often, the drought stress simulations and testing methods used in genomics are at fault. Guidelines for relevant drought stress physiological methods in genomics are suggested.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Retrotransposon-based molecular markers for assessment of genomic diversity 
Ahmed M. Alzohairy, Gábor Gyulai, Mohamed F. Ramadan, Sherif Edris, Jamal S. M. Sabir, Robert K. Jansen, Hala F. Eissa and Ahmed Bahieldin

Retrotransposons (RTs) are major components of most eukaryotic genomes. Molecular markers play an essential role in all aspects of genetics and genomics, and RTs represent a powerful tool compared with other molecular and morphological markers. Here, we review the utility of some PCR retrotransposon-based molecular markers, including inter-primer binding sequence (IPBS), sequence-specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP), retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP), inter retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) and retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP).

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Published online 04 April 2014
Photosynthesis–nitrogen relationships in tropical forest tree species as affected by soil phosphorus availability: a controlled environment study 
Keith J. Bloomfield, Graham D. Farquhar and Jon Lloyd

Tropical forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle and there is growing evidence that here, phosphorus (rather than nitrogen) may be the key nutrient limiting photosynthetic rates. In a greenhouse study of Australian tropical tree species, we found that phosphorus limitation reduced photosynthetic capacity and altered nitrogen use. The results underline the importance of phosphorus effects for future studies of tropical forest productivity.

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Published online 03 April 2014
Partial root zone drying exerts different physiological responses on field-grown grapevine (Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell) in comparison to regulated deficit irrigation 
Pascual Romero, Juan Gabriel Pérez-Pérez, Francisco M. del Amor, Adrián Martinez-Cutillas, Ian C. Dodd and Pablo Botía

High irrigation volumes applied to the wet part of the root system are critical to successfully implement partial root zone drying irrigation (PRI) to improve vine performance compared to regulated deficit irrigation under semiarid conditions. Physiological responses induced by PRI were due to both the placement of irrigation and the volume of water. Thresholds and optima of soil water content in wet and dry root zones were established.

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Published online 01 April 2014
Fruit presence negatively affects photosynthesis by reducing leaf nitrogen in almond 
Sebastian Saa and Patrick H. Brown

Fruiting in many tree species is known to impact productivity in subsequent years. In this research we tested whether almond fruit competes with leaves for nitrogen and hypothesised how this would impact leaf carbon assimilation rates through the season. The results showed that almond cannot supply sufficient nitrogen simultaneously to fully satisfy the demands of leaves and fruits born in the same spur (principal bearing structure of almond trees).

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Published online 27 March 2014
Water uptake and redistribution during drought in a semiarid shrub species 
Iván Prieto, Francisco I. Pugnaire and Ronald J. Ryel

In arid systems plants die during long drought periods and their performance may depend on their use of episodic rain events. Water from these events is often rapidly lost to evaporation but plants may draw it to deep soil layers, storing it to prevent evaporation and to allow for an efficient use. This mechanism supports longer plant survival and may be of great relevance in dry environments.

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Published online 27 March 2014
Soil water-holding capacity mediates hydraulic and hormonal signals of near-isohydric and near-anisohydric Vitis cultivars in potted grapevines 
Sara Tramontini, Johanna Döring, Marco Vitali, Alessandra Ferrandino, Manfred Stoll and Claudio Lovisolo

The ecophysiological behaviour of grapevine cultivars in response to drought is influenced by the soil conditions and by the plant genotype. These two components interact through a complex of hydraulic and hormonal signal exchanges occurring between roots and leaves. Our work highlights the differences in these signals observed in a near-isohydric and a near-anisohydric grapevine cultivars on two soil substrates with different textures, causing different dynamics of water deprivation during an imposed increasing water stress.

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Published online 26 March 2014
Antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns in peanut nodules during a drought and rehydration cycle 
Ana Laura Furlan, Eliana Bianucci, María del Carmen Tordable, Stella Castro and Karl-Josef Dietz

It is well known that drought is an environmental stress that negatively affects peanut growth and nodulation; however, plant recovery analyses are scarce. This study establishes a framework for analysing the response of biological nitrogen fixation and antioxidant systems in a drought–recovery cycle. Efficient and dynamic regulation of antioxidant enzymes during the cycle is crucial for the restoration of normal redox metabolism within 3 days after onset of rehydration.

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Published online 26 March 2014
Jasmonic acid is associated with resistance to twospotted spider mites in diploid cotton (Gossypium arboreum) 
Junji Miyazaki, Warwick N. Stiller, Thy T. Truong, Qian Xu, Charles H. Hocart, Lewis J. Wilson and Iain W. Wilson

Cotton genotypes resistant to debilitating spider mite infestations could be used to breed mite resistant commercial cultivars and reduce yield loss and pesticide use. We found that jasmonic acid was present at higher levels in the resistant genotype. Jasmonic acid represents a possible selection tool to dramatically speed up breeding of mite resistant cotton cultivars.

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Published online 26 March 2014
Modification of the expression of two NPR1 suppressors, SNC1 and SNI1, in soybean confers partial resistance to the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines 
Andrea Maldonado, Reham Youssef, Margaret McDonald, Eric Brewer, Hunter Beard and Benjamin Matthews

Major losses in soybean production are reported annually due to the attack of the soybean cyst nematode. Soybean roots were transformed to modify the expression of two genes involved in the defence mechanism of plants against pathogens, and their response to nematode attack was studied. The treatments conferred enhanced resistance to the cyst nematode, providing an interesting strategy to improve crop protection against pathogens.

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Published online 25 March 2014
Evaluating growth platforms and stress scenarios to assess the salt tolerance of wheat plants 
Harald Hackl, Yuncai Hu and Urs Schmidhalter

Selection of crops under saline conditions has been notoriously difficult. Simplified platforms and stress scenarios are used too often to evaluate the salt tolerance and to extrapolate to real field conditions. We evaluated growth platforms and stress scenarios and conclude that a combined salinity + drought stress scenario and a reliable growth platform are of utmost importance in screening for salt tolerance.

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Published online 18 March 2014
Alternative electron sinks are crucial for conferring photoprotection in field-grown cotton under water deficit during flowering and boll setting stages 
Xiao-Ping Yi, Ya-Li Zhang, He-Sheng Yao, Xiang-Juan Zhang, Hong-Hai Luo, Ling Gou and Wang-Feng Zhang

The mechanism of drought tolerance may be related to a photoprotective feature in cotton plants. Mehler-peroxidation reaction, photorespiration and nitrate metabolism serve as efficient alternative sinks for excess electrons to maintain electron transport flux. They are important photoprotective mechanisms in field-grown cotton to cope with drought.

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Published online 11 March 2014
Plasmalemma localisation of DOUBLE HYBRID PROLINE-RICH PROTEIN 1 and its function in systemic acquired resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana 
Ben-Chang Li, Chen Zhang, Qiu-Xia Chai, Yao-Yao Han, Xiao-Yan Wang, Meng-Xin Liu, Huan Feng and Zi-Qin Xu

The function of AtDHyPRP1 in defence response of Arabidopsis to bacterial and fungal pathogens was determined with overexpressing and RNA interference lines. AtDHyPRP1 was localised to plasmalemma and was associated with systemic acquired resistance. As a lipid transfer protein, AtDHyPRP1 is probably involved in perception and translocation of long-distance signals derived from biotic stresses via vascular tissue or plasmodesmata.

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Published online 05 March 2014
Environmental stress activation of plant long-terminal repeat retrotransposons 
Ahmed M. Alzohairy, Jamal S. M. Sabir, Gábor Gyulai, Rania A. A. Younis, Robert K. Jansen and Ahmed Bahieldin

Abiotic and biotic stresses activate long-terminal repeat retrotransposons in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In this article, we reviewed the ways that retrotransposons are activated by environmental stimuli to affect restructuring and diversification of the host genome. We recommend the use of RNA-Seq data of other plant species (e.g., Rhazya stricta) to get a deeper view of activation patterns.

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Published online 24 February 2014
Physiological, proteomic and transcriptional responses of wheat to combination of drought or waterlogging with late spring low temperature 
Xiangnan Li, Jian Cai, Fulai Liu, Tingbo Dai, Weixing Cao and Dong Jiang

The increasing climatic variability results in wheat being exposed to more frequent adversities including combined low temperature and drought/waterlogging. The physiological, proteomic and transcriptional responses of wheat plants to these combined stresses were reported. The knowledge will help comprehensively understand the climate change impacts on wheat production and help optimise water management strategy to cope with the abiotic stresses.

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Published online 19 February 2014
Diversity and species identity effects on fine root productivity and turnover in a species-rich temperate broad-leaved forest 
Andreas Jacob, Dietrich Hertel and Christoph Leuschner

It has been suggested that mixed forests may be more productive than mono-specific forests, but not much is known about belowground (root) production. With an ingrowth core study in 100 plots in an old-growth forest, we show that species identity is important, whereas species diversity per se influenced only fine root turnover but not fine root production.

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Published online 17 February 2014
Spring barley shows dynamic compensatory root and shoot growth responses when exposed to localised soil compaction and fertilisation 
Johannes Pfeifer, Marc Faget, Achim Walter, Stephan Blossfeld, Fabio Fiorani, Ulrich Schurr and Kerstin A. Nagel

The effects of localised soil compaction plus nutrient availability on root system architecture (RSA) and root growth dynamics have scarcely been investigated. We investigated the impact of heterogeneous soil conditions on barley RSA, and root and shoot growth using split-root rhizotrons, and observed dynamic compensatory alterations, particularly in lateral root initiation. In loose compartments formation of lateral roots started earlier than in uniform treatments and was significantly increased in compacted compartments when only these compartments were fertilised.

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Published online 17 February 2014
Overexpression of a pepper CaERF5 gene in tobacco plants enhances resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection 
Yan Lai, Fengfeng Dang, Jing Lin, Lu Yu, Jinhui Lin, Yufen Lei, Chengcong Chen, Zhiqin Liu, Ailian Qiu, Shaoliang Mou, Deyi Guan, Yang Wu and Shuilin He

ERF transcription factors are implicated in a range of biological processes. However, molecular functions of most pepper ERFs remain uncharacterised. We have shown that overexpression of a pepper CaERF5 gene in tobacco enhances resistance to a bacterial disease, likely by activation of defence genes. Our results suggest that CaERF5 acts as a positive regulator in plant defence, and that overexpression of CaERF5 can be used to enhance disease resistance in crop species.

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Published online 14 February 2014
Distinction and characterisation of salinity tolerant and sensitive rice cultivars as probed by the chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and growth parameters 
Devendra Pratap Singh and Ramani Kumar Sarkar

Designing an effective phenotyping strategy requires thorough understanding of plant survival under salt stress. This study aimed at characterising rice cultivars differing in salinity tolerance based on changes in chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, growth parameters and ion accumulation. Salinity factor index calculated from PIABS clearly distinguished tolerance level among the cultivars. Some new salt-tolerant cultivars were identified, which could serve as donors in breeding programme and for identification of additional QTL/genes.

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Published online 14 February 2014
Physiological basis of salt stress tolerance in rice expressing the antiapoptotic gene SfIAP 
Thi My Linh Hoang, Brett Williams, Harjeet Khanna, James Dale and Sagadevan G. Mundree

Salinity is a growing problem worldwide that causes a significant reduction in crop yields. We have addressed this problem by manipulating the programmed cell death pathways in rice, resulting in enhanced salt stress tolerance. The implication is that farmers could grow rice containing such a trait in environments where salinisation of the soil exists, thereby addressing food security needs.

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Published online 10 February 2014
Variation in mesophyll conductance among Australian wheat genotypes 
Eisrat Jahan, Jeffrey S. Amthor, Graham D. Farquhar, Richard Trethowan and Margaret M. Barbour

Conductance to CO2 diffusion within leaves (mesophyll conductance) forms a significant and variable limitation on photosynthesis but remains poorly understood. Here, mesophyll conductance was found to vary 2-fold among wheat genotypes, and to be positively related to photosynthetic rate. These results suggest that both photosynthetic rate and water-use efficiency could be improved through breeding for higher mesophyll conductance.

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Published online 03 February 2014
Does the hydrocooling of Vitis vinifera cv. Semillon vines protect the vegetative and reproductive growth processes and vine performance against high summer temperatures? 
Dennis H. Greer and Mark M. Weedon

Heat events are a natural summer occurrence in Australian vineyards but costly in lost production, thus, protecting vines during these events is an economically important issue. We have assessed spraying water onto vines for brief periods as a means of reducing canopy temperatures. The canopies were nearly 10°C cooler during the heat events and both yields and berry composition were improved, suggesting spraying water onto vines is an effective means of reducing impacts of high temperatures.

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Published online 30 January 2014
Over-expression of SlCycA3 gene in Arabidopsis accelerated the cell cycle transition 
Jia Guo, Jiawen Wu, Tiantian Zhang and Haijun Gong

Since the connection between cyclins and plant development involving plant hormones is poorly understood, we characterise the SlCycA3 gene to determine the effect of A3-type cyclin gene on cell-cycle-related plant growth and its regulation mechanisms under auxin treatment. Our results showed that overexpression of the SlCycA3 gene accelerated root growth and development. Cyclin abundance may function as a regulator to control root growth in response to plant hormone treatment.

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Published online 30 January 2014
Assessment of phloem mobility of xenobiotics in Triticum aestivum and Brachypodium distachyon 
Olena Zhivotovsky Castello, Andrew J. Bowling, Gerrit Deboer and Yelena Adelfinskaya

Measurement of the phloem translocation of herbicides is a challenge, especially at the initial development of compounds. B. distachyon was evaluated for potential use in phloem bioassay showing a clear evidence of xylem discontinuity. This novel bioassay provides an opportunity to determine quantitatively phloem mobility of molecules in vivo without the use of radiolabel and with a high throughput during the early stages of pesticides research.

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Published online 29 January 2014
Is the differential response of riparian plant performance to extreme drought and inundation events related to differences in intraspecific trait variation? 
Yasmijn A. M. van der Knaap, Rien Aerts and Peter M. van Bodegom

Climate change scenarios predict an increase in extreme climatic events. In our study we tested the effects of multiple extreme events on plant performance and trait intraspecific variation, and discovered that trait intraspecific variation was not induced by extreme events. However, multiple extreme events have quantitatively and qualitatively different impacts on plant performance than single events and it is difficult to predict those impacts beforehand, which hampers predicting plant responses to a future climate.

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Published online 29 January 2014
Stomatal pore size and density in mangrove leaves and artificial leaves: effects on leaf water isotopic enrichment during transpiration 
Leonel da Silveira Lobo Sternberg and Lynn M. Manganiello

In order to further the use of plant biomass stable isotope ratios as a proxy for environmental stressors such as drought and salinity, we must understand the long-term impact of such stressors on the isotopic composition of leaf water. Here we show with stomatal count and artificial leaves, that the lower leaf water isotopic enrichment observed in mangroves compared to freshwater plants is due their larger and lower density of stomatal pores. Our results have important implications in interpreting paleoclimate with tree ring oxygen isotope ratios, since stomatal frequency and size has varied over the ages.

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Published online 24 January 2014
Morpho-structural and physiological response of container-grown Sangiovese and Montepulciano cvv. (Vitis vinifera) to re-watering after a pre-veraison limiting water deficit 
Alberto Palliotti, Sergio Tombesi, Tommaso Frioni, Franco Famiani, Oriana Silvestroni, Maurizio Zamboni and Stefano Poni

The intraspecific diversity of Sangiovese and Montepulciano grapevine varieties is accentuated under early water deficit. Higher physiological and productive efficiency under non-limiting water supply noted by the near-isohydric Montepulciano compared with the near-anisohydric Sangiovese was reversed when both cultivars were subjected to a pre-veraison water deficit. Sangiovese had excellent net CO2 exchange (NCER) recovery upon re-watering and is confirmed to be better adapted to dry/hot conditions.

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blank image Functional Plant Biology
Volume 41 Number 5 2014

 
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Descriptive Table of Contents 
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Photophysiological responses of marine diatoms to elevated CO2 and decreased pH: a review 
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Kunshan Gao and Douglas A. Campbell
pp. 449-459

Marine diatoms show diverse growth responses to increasing pCO2 and the associated changes to seawater carbonate system. These responses reflect physiological diversities across diatoms, but also complex interactions among responses to pCO2, pH, nutrient availability, light levels and fluctuations. Predicting net diatom growth responses to ocean acidification will require integrated measures.

   |        Open Access Article
 

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The rate of drying determines the extent of desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens 
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Joshua L. Greenwood and Lloyd R. Stark
pp. 460-467

This paper presents new results indicating that Physcomitrella patens (the model organism for bryophytes) is desiccation tolerant. We provide a method to induce desiccation tolerance with supporting evidence for tolerance. This work provides an outline for future studies on desiccation using an organism both amenable to cultivation and in possession of a fully sequenced genome.

 
  
 

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Soil water availability influences the temperature response of photosynthesis and respiration in a grass and a woody shrub 
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Tony Joseph, David Whitehead and Matthew H. Turnbull
pp. 468-481

Understanding the interactive effects of temperature and water availability on plant carbon exchange is essential to predict the impact of environmental changes on plant productivity. Here, soil drying was used to determine the short-term temperature response of photosynthesis and respiration under varying soil water contents, and to resolve their combined effects. Water availability influenced the temperature sensitivity of photosynthesis and respiration, and altered the balance between carbon gain and loss.

 
    | Supplementary Material (382 KB)
 

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More fertile florets and grains per spike can be achieved at higher temperature in wheat lines with high spike biomass and sugar content at booting 
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M. Fernanda Dreccer, Kimberley B. Wockner, Jairo A. Palta, C. Lynne McIntyre, M. Gabriela Borgognone, Maryse Bourgault, Matthew Reynolds and Daniel J. Miralles
pp. 482-495

To keep wheat productive under high temperature and long photoperiod requires an understanding of processes regulating floret and grain number. Genotypes with high stem soluble carbohydrates had slower floret development and higher grain set at high temperature, higher spike biomass, higher glucose and more florets and grains per spike across environments. Our findings highlight an interaction between carbohydrates and floret development that could be exploited in warmer environments.

   | Supplementary Material (48 KB)  |        Open Access Article
 

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Changes in the concentration of organic acids in roots and leaves of carob-tree under Fe deficiency 
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Pedro José Correia, Florinda Gama, Teresa Saavedra, Maria Graça Miguel, José Paulo Da Silva, Anunciación Abadía, Amarilis de Varennes and Maribela Pestana
pp. 496-504

Carob tree is a crop well adapted to calcareous soils that does not develop iron (Fe) chlorosis. The lack of Fe triggers an increase of organic acids and activity of the root ferric chelate-reductase as response mechanisms. Understanding physiological mechanisms of this species could improve the strategy to cope with nutritional imbalances and avoid excessive application of fertilisers.

 
  
 

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Drought resistance and soil water extraction of a perennial C4 grass: contributions of root and rhizome traits 
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Yi Zhou, Christopher J. Lambrides and Shu Fukai
pp. 505-519

Soil water extraction by perennial grasses under drought conditions is not well understood but has important implications for agricultural productivity as the climate changes. We studied the variation among 18 bermudagrasses for soil water extraction and drought resistance in a drying soil profile. We found that drought resistance was associated with rhizome production rather than rooting depth and root distribution.

 
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Xylem as the main origin of stem radius changes in Eucalyptus 
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Roman Zweifel, David M. Drew, Fritz Schweingruber and Geoffrey M. Downes
pp. 520-534

Tree stems shrink and expand in radius with transpiration-induced negative pressures. So far, these fluctuations have mainly been related to shrinkage in living cells of the bark which act as a buffer for water potential peaks in the rigid water transport system of the wood. Here we propose that Eucalyptus globulus as a fast-growing species maintains immature, non- or partially lignified xylem which acts as an additional water storage in the sapwood and, thus, alters the performance of the water supply system of the entire tree.

 
  
 

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Vapour pressure deficit aids the interpretation of cotton canopy temperature response to water deficit 
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Warren C. Conaty, James R. Mahan, James E. Neilsen and Greg A. Constable
pp. 535-546

Canopy temperature has been identified as a real-time, plant-based tool which may provide gains in irrigation efficiency. However, canopy temperature response to water stress is confounded by environmental conditions. In order to better use canopy temperature for irrigation scheduling, the relationship between environmental conditions and plant water stress physiology was explored. From this research we conclude that point-in-time measures of canopy temperature for water stress detection are better understood with the inclusion of atmospheric vapour pressure deficit.

 
  
 

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Impact of light on leaf initiation: a matter of photosynthate availability in the apical bud? 
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Andreas Savvides, Nikolaos Ntagkas, Wim van Ieperen, Janneke A. Dieleman and Leo F. M. Marcelis
pp. 547-556

Leaf initiation rate (LIR) is strongly modulated by temperature and commonly predicted solely based on thermal time. We investigated the effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) on LIR in cucumber and tomato plants. LIR and photosynthate availability in the apical bud substantially decreased at low PPFD in both species suggesting that PPFD is limiting for LIR most likely via photosynthate availability in the apical bud.

 
  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    FP13338  Accepted 22 April 2014
    Review on shape formation in epidermal pavement cells of the Arabidopsis leaf.
    Eveline Jacques, Jean-Pierre Verbelen, Kris Vissenberg
    Abstract


    FP14048  Accepted 18 April 2014
    Crop Yield Potential – A Product of an Interplay Between Photoassimilate Supply- and Utilization-Limited Organ Development
    John Patrick, Kim Kolyvas
    Abstract


    FP13370  Accepted 14 April 2014
    Genetic variability and identification of QTLs affecting plant growth and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in the model legume Medicago truncatula under control and salt conditions
    Ahmad Sarrafi, Maryam Foroozanfar, Sara Exbrayat, Laurent Gentzbittel, George Bertoni, Pierre Maury, Mohammad Reza Naghavi, Ali Peyghambari, Mounawer Badri, Cecile Ben, Frederic Debelle
    Abstract


    FP13324  Accepted 14 April 2014
    Grain yield and physiological traits of rice drought-yield QTL qDTY12.1 lines showed different responses to drought and soil characteristics in upland environments
    Amelia Henry, Shalabh Dixit, Nimai Mandal, S Anantha, Rolando Torres, Arvind Kumar
    Abstract


    FP13302  Accepted 11 April 2014
    When smaller is better: leaf hydraulic conductance and drought vulnerability correlate to leaf size and venation density across four Coffea arabica L. genotypes
    Andrea Nardini, Eele Ounapuu-Pikas, Tadeja Savi
    Abstract


    FP14067  Accepted 07 April 2014
    Genotype-dependent influence of night-time vapour pressure deficit on night-time transpiration and daytime gas exchange in wheat
    Rémy Schoppach, Elodie Claverie, Walid Sadok
    Abstract


    FP13299  Accepted 06 April 2014
    Alterations in stem sugar content and metabolism in sorghum genoptypes subjected to drought stress
    Hilal Qazi, Pinnamaneni SrinivasaRao, Akanksha Kashikar, Penna Suprasanna, Sujata Bhargava
    Abstract


    FP14057  Accepted 02 April 2014
    Strategies to increase yield and yield stability of crops under drought – are we making progress?
    Neil Turner, Abraham Blum, Mehmet Cakir, Pasquale Steduto, Roberto Tuberosa , Neil Young
    Abstract


    FP13222  Accepted 27 March 2014
    Cytosolic alkalization and nitric oxide production in UV-B-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis
    Xiao-Min Ge, Yan Zhu, Jun-Min He
    Abstract


    FP13330  Accepted 25 March 2014
    Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils
    Mutez Ahmed, Eva Kroener, Maire Holz, Mohsen Zarebanadkouki, Andrea Carminati
    Abstract


    FP14035  Accepted 24 March 2014
    Seed storage albumins: biosynthesis, trafficking and structures (Goldacre Review)
    Joshua Mylne, Ikuko Hara-Nishimura, Karl Rosengren
    Abstract


    FP14046  Accepted 21 March 2014
    Bark and woody tissue photosynthesis: A means to avoid hypoxia or anoxia in developing stem tissues
    Christiane Wittmann, Hardy Pfanz
    Abstract


    FP13359  Accepted 08 March 2014
    Response of root aeration of rice to Fe2+
    Jenjira Mongon, Dennis Konnerup, Tim Colmer, Benjavan Rerkasem
    Abstract


    FP13291  Accepted 08 March 2014
    Root traits and cellular level tolerance hold the key in maintaining higher spikelet fertility of rice under water limited conditions
    Bheemanahalli Raju, Beerasandra Narayanaswamy, Malagondandhalli Mohankumar, Kambalimath Sumanth, Mavinahalli Rajanna, Basavaiah Monahraju, Makarla Udayakumar, Madavalam Sheshshayee
    Abstract


    FP13284  Accepted 19 February 2014
    Limited photosynthetic plasticity in the leaf-succulent CAM plant Agave angustifolia grown at different temperatures
    Joseph Holtum, Klaus Winter
    Abstract


    FP13265  Accepted 28 January 2014
    SsHKT1;1 is a potassium transporter of a C3 halophyte Suaeda salsa involving in salt tolerance
    Qun Shao, Ning Han, Tonglou Ding, Feng Zhou, Baoshan Wang
    Abstract




The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 12 December 2013
Development and evaluation of a field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform

Pedro Andrade-Sanchez, Michael A. Gore, John T. Heun, Kelly R. Thorp, A. Elizabete Carmo-Silva, Andrew N. French, Michael E. Salvucci and Jeffrey W. White

2. Published 12 June 2013
Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

Lucas A. Cernusak, Klaus Winter, James W. Dalling, Joseph A. M. Holtum, Carlos Jaramillo, Christian Körner, Andrew D. B. Leakey, Richard J. Norby, Benjamin Poulter, Benjamin L. Turner and S. Joseph Wright

3. Published 12 July 2013
Sensors and imaging techniques for the assessment of the delay of wheat senescence induced by fungicides

Carlos Andres Berdugo, Anne-Katrin Mahlein, Ulrike Steiner, Heinz-Wilhelm Dehne and Erich-Christian Oerke

4. Published 6 January 2014
Wheat genotypes with high early vigour accumulate more nitrogen and have higher photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency during early growth

Jiayin Pang, Jairo A. Palta, Gregory J. Rebetzke and Stephen P. Milroy

5. Published 12 June 2013
Analysis of the expression of terpene synthase genes in relation to aroma content in two aromatic Vitis vinifera varieties

Fabiola Matarese, Giancarlo Scalabrelli and Claudio D'Onofrio

6. Published 14 May 2013
Genetic variation in the root growth response of barley genotypes to salinity stress

Megan C. Shelden, Ute Roessner, Robert E. Sharp, Mark Tester and Antony Bacic

7. Published 2 August 2013
Plant proteome responses to salinity stress – comparison of glycophytes and halophytes

Klára Kosová, Pavel Vítámvás, Milan Oldřich Urban and Ilja Tom Prášil

8. Published 6 January 2014
Plot size matters: interference from intergenotypic competition in plant phenotyping studies

Greg J. Rebetzke, Ralph (Tony) A. Fischer, Anthony F. van Herwaarden, Dave G. Bonnett, Karine Chenu, Allan R. Rattey and Neil A. Fettell

9. Published 11 February 2014
Root growth and anchorage by transplanted ‘Tifgreen’ (Cynodon dactylon x C. transvaalensis) turfgrass

Jeffrey S. Amthor and James B. Beard

10. Published 15 April 2013
TaPht1;4, a high-affinity phosphate transporter gene in wheat (Triticum aestivum), plays an important role in plant phosphate acquisition under phosphorus deprivation

Xiaoman Liu, Xiaolei Zhao, Lijun Zhang, Wenjing Lu, Xiaojuan Li and Kai Xiao

11. Published 14 May 2013
Goldacre Review: The mixotrophic nature of photosynthetic plants

Susanne Schmidt, John A. Raven and Chanyarat Paungfoo-Lonhienne

12. Published 12 July 2013
Quantifying the relationship between temperature regulation in the ear and floret development stage in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under heat and drought stress

Frederick T. Steinmeyer, Martin Lukac, Matthew P. Reynolds and Hannah E. Jones

13. Published 2 August 2013
Balancing salinity stress responses in halophytes and non-halophytes: a comparison between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis thaliana

Dorothea Bartels and Challabathula Dinakar

14. Published 13 September 2013
Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

Aguida M. A. P. Morales, Jamie A. O'Rourke, Martijn van de Mortel, Katherine T. Scheider, Timothy J. Bancroft, Aluízio Borém, Rex T. Nelson, Dan Nettleton, Thomas J. Baum, Randy C. Shoemaker, Reid D. Frederick, Ricardo V. Abdelnoor, Kerry F. Pedley, Steven A. Whitham and Michelle A. Graham

15. Published 13 September 2013
Production of high oleic rice grains by suppressing the expression of the OsFAD2-1 gene

Ella Simone Zaplin, Qing Liu, Zhongyi Li, Vito M. Butardo, Christopher L. Blanchard and Sadequr Rahman

16. Published 15 November 2013
Plant–aphid interactions with a focus on legumes

Lars G. Kamphuis, Katherine Zulak, Ling-Ling Gao, Jonathan Anderson and Karam B. Singh

17. Published 12 June 2013
Differential response of root proteome to drought stress in drought sensitive and tolerant sunflower inbred lines

Mehdi Ghaffari, Mahmoud Toorchi, Mostafa Valizadeh and Setsuko Komatsu

18. Published 14 May 2013
Expression profile of transcripts encoding cell wall remodelling proteins in tomato fruit cv. Micro-Tom subjected to 15°C storage

Gabriela L. Müller, Claudio O. Budde, Martin A. Lauxmann, Agustina Triassi, Carlos S. Andreo, María F. Drincovich and María V. Lara

19. Published 15 November 2013
FT genes and regulation of flowering in the legume Medicago truncatula

Joanna Putterill, Lulu Zhang, Chin Chin Yeoh, Martin Balcerowicz, Mauren Jaudal and Erika Varkonyi Gasic

20. Published 12 June 2013
Ripening of grape berries can be advanced or delayed by reagents that either reduce or increase ethylene levels

Christine Böttcher, Katie E. Harvey, Paul K. Boss and Christopher Davies


      
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