Functional Plant Biology Functional Plant Biology Society
Plant function and evolutionary biology
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Chlorophyll fluorescence screening of Arabidopsis thaliana for CO2 sensitive photorespiration and photoinhibition mutants

Murray R. Badger A B , Hossein Fallahi A , Sarah Kaines A and Shunichi Takahashi A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Molecular Plant Physiology Group and ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.

B Corresponding author. Email: murray.badger@anu.edu.au

This paper originates from a presentation at the 1st International Plant Phenomics Symposium, Canberra, Australia, April 2009.

Functional Plant Biology 36(11) 867-873 https://doi.org/10.1071/FP09199
Submitted: 28 July 2009  Accepted: 17 September 2009   Published: 5 November 2009

Abstract

Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) photorespiration mutants to air leads to a rapid decline in the Fv/Fm chlorophyll fluorescence parameter, reflecting a decline in PSII function and an onset of photoinhibition. This paper demonstrates that chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of Fv/Fm can be used as an easy and efficient means of detecting Arabidopsis mutants that are impaired in various aspects of photorespiration. This screen was developed to be sensitive and high throughput by the use of exposure to zero CO2 conditions and the use of array grids of 1-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings as the starting material for imaging. Using this procedure, we screened ~25 000 chemically mutagenised M2 Arabidopsis seeds and recovered photorespiration phenotypes (reduction in Fv/Fm at low CO2) at a frequency of ~4 per 1000 seeds. In addition, we also recovered mutants that showed reduced Fv/Fm at high CO2. Of this group, we detected a novel ‘reverse photorespiration’ phenotype that showed a high CO2 dependent reduction in Fv/Fm. This chlorophyll fluorescence screening technique promises to reveal novel mutants associated with photorespiration and photoinhibition.

Additional keywords: high CO2, fluorescence imaging, photosystem II, photosynthesis.


References


Andersson I (2008) Catalysis and regulation in Rubisco. Journal of Experimental Botany 59, 1555–1568.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Badger MR , Andrews TJ (1987) Co-evolution of Rubisco and CO2 concentrating mechanisms. In ‘Progress in photosynthesis research. Vol. III’. (Ed. J Biggins) pp. 601–609. (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers: Dordrecht)

Blackwell RD, Murray AJS, Lea PJ, Kendall AC, Hall NP, Turner JC, Wallsgrove RM (1988) The value of mutants unable to carry out photorespiration. Photosynthesis Research 16, 155–176.
CrossRef |

Boldt R, Edner C, Kolukisaoglu U, Hagemann M, Weckwerth W, Wienkoop S, Morgenthal K, Bauwe H (2005) D-glycerate 3-kinase, the last unknown enzyme in the photorespiratory cycle in Arabidopsis, belongs to a novel kinase family. The Plant Cell 17, 2413–2420.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Cousins AB, Pracharoenwattana I, Zhou W, Smith SM, Badger MR (2008) Peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release. Plant Physiology 148, 786–795.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Foyer CH, Bloom AJ, Queval G, Noctor G (2009) Photorespiratory metabolism: genes, mutants, energetics, and redox signaling. Annual Review of Plant Biology 60, 455–484.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Leverenz JW, Oquist G, Wingsle G (1992) Photosynthesis and photoinhibition in leaves of chlorophyll-b-less barley in relation to absorbed light. Physiologia Plantarum 85, 495–502.
CrossRef |

Long SP, Zhu XG, Naidu SL, Ort DR (2006) Can improvement in photosynthesis increase crop yields? Plant, Cell & Environment 29, 315–330.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Meurer J, Meierhoff K, Westhoff P (1996) Isolation of high-chlorophyll-fluorescence mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and their characterisation by spectroscopy, immunoblotting and Northern hybridisation. Planta 198, 385–396.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Niyogi KK, Bjorkman O, Grossman AR (1997) Chlamydomonas xanthophyll cycle mutants identified by video imaging of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. The Plant Cell 9, 1369–1380.
CrossRef | PubMed |


Oxborough K, Baker NR (1997) An instrument capable of imaging chlorophyll alpha fluorescence from intact leaves at very low irradiance and at cellular and subcellular levels of organization. Plant, Cell & Environment 20, 1473–1483.
CrossRef |

Parry MAJ, Andralojc PJ, Mitchell RAC, Madgwick PJ, Keys AJ (2003) Manipulation of Rubisco: the amount, activity, function and regulation. Journal of Experimental Botany 54, 1321–1333.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Renné P, Dreßen U, Hebbeker U, Hille D, Flügge UI, Westhoff P, Weber AP (2003) The Arabidopsis mutant dct is deficient in the plastidic glutamate/malate translocator DiT2. The Plant Journal 35, 316–331.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Shikanai T, Munekage Y, Shimizu K, Endo T, Hashimoto T (1999) Identification and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants with reduced quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. Plant & Cell Physiology 40, 1134–1142.
PubMed |


Somerville CR (1984) The analysis of photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation and photorespiration by mutant selection. In ‘Oxford surveys of plant molecular and cell biology’. (Ed. BJ Miflin) pp. 103–131. (Oxford University Press: Oxford)

Somerville CR (1986) Analysis of photosynthesis with mutants of higher plants and algae. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 37, 467–507.
CrossRef |

Somerville CR (2001) An early Arabidopsis demonstration. Resolving a few issues concerning photorespiration. Plant Physiology 125, 20–24.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Somerville CR, Ogren WL (1981) Photorespiration-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking mitochondrial serine transhydroxymethylase activity. Plant Physiology 67, 666–671.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Somerville SC, Ogren WL (1983) An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective in chloroplast dicarboxylate transport. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 80, 1290–1294.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Somerville CR, Portis AR, Ogren WL (1982) A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana which lacks activation of RUBP carboxylase in vivo. Plant Physiology 70, 381–387.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Takahashi S, Bauwe H, Badger M (2007) Impairment of the photorespiratory pathway accelerates photoinhibition of photosystem II by suppression of repair but not acceleration of damage processes in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiology 144, 487–494.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Timm S, Nunes-Nesi A, Parnik T, Morgenthal K, Wienkoop S, Keerberg O, Weckwerth W, Kleczkowski LA, Fernie AR, Bauwe H (2008) A cytosolic pathway for the conversion of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate during photorespiration in Arabidopsis. The Plant Cell 20, 2848–2859.
CrossRef | PubMed |

Voll LM, Jamai A, Renne P, Voll H, McClung CR, Weber AP (2006) The photorespiratory Arabidopsis shm1 mutant is deficient in SHM1. Plant Physiology 140, 59–66.
CrossRef | PubMed |

von Caemmerer S (2000) ‘Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis.’ (CSIRO Publishing: Collingwood, Australia)

Werneke JM, Chatfield JM, Ogren WL (1989) Alternative mRNA splicing generates the two ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase polypeptides in spinach and Arabidopsis. The Plant Cell 1, 815–825.
CrossRef | PubMed |








Rent Article (via Deepdyve) Supplementary MaterialSupplementary Material (469 KB) Export Citation Cited By (15)