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Marine & Freshwater Research is a multidisciplinary journal publishing original research and reviews on all aquatic environments and subject areas. More

Editor-in-Chief: Max Finlayson

 
 
 

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Published online 31 July 2015
Patterned fen formation and development from the Great Sandy Region, south-east Queensland, Australia 
Patrick Moss, John Tibby, Felicity Shapland, Russell Fairfax, Philip Stewart, Cameron Barr, Lynda Petherick, Allen Gontz and Craig Sloss

This paper examines formation and development of the only known subtropical, Southern Hemisphere patterned fen wetlands from Fraser Island, Queensland, through the examination of swamp sediments and fossil pollen. The development of these globally important wetlands occurs within the broader Wire Rush wetlands, which formed from 12 000 years ago and are important refuge areas for the region’s unique animals.

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Published online 31 July 2015
A Ramsar-wetland in suburbia: wetland management in an urbanised, industrialised area 
S. J. Kermode, H. Heijnis, H. Wong, A. Zawadzki, P. Gadd and A. Permana

Towra Point Nature Reserve, in Sydney’s Botany Bay, is an internationally important wetland which is at risk due to human activities. This research aimed to check whether contamination from industry and urbanisation of the region have had negative impact, and found that levels of arsenic, lead and zinc are elevated on the southern side of the embayment. We propose that trigger levels outlined in water and sediment quality guidelines should be included in the Towra Point Plan of Management, so that elevated levels will initiate a management response from relevant authorities.

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Published online 29 July 2015
First data on the age, growth and sexual maturity of the piked spurdog, Squalus megalops (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae), in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea) 
Sondes Marouani, Hasna Kadri and Mohamed Nejmeddine Bradai

The occurrence of Squalus megalops in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea) is recently confirmed; life cycle of this shark is crucial for its conservation. Thus, growth, longevity, natural mortality and size and age at maturity of, are reported. The data approve that S. megalops have a k-strategy in its life history.

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Published online 23 July 2015
Muddy waters: the influence of high suspended-sediment concentration on the diving behaviour of a bimodally respiring freshwater turtle from north-eastern Australia 
Jason R. Schaffer, Mark Hamann, Richard Rowe and Damien W. Burrows

This study represents the first investigation into the impact of elevated suspended sediment concentrations on the diving behaviour of a bimodally respiring, freshwater turtle (Elseya irwini). Our data demonstrate that increased suspended sediment directly affects the utilisation of aquatic respiration by this species to extend submergence times under optimal conditions. These observations raise concerns about the effects of erosion and catchment land management practices, on the long term sustainability of physiologically specialised freshwater turtle populations.

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Published online 22 July 2015
The effects of growth anomaly on susceptibility of Montipora capitata to turf algal overgrowth 
D. C. Claar and M. Takabayashi

Disease affects not only the biological function of coral, but it may also affect the ability of corals to compete with other species in their environment. This study evaluated the effect of growth anomalies (GAs) on the susceptibility of the coral M. capitata to algal overgrowth. The relationship between GA and algal overgrowth was weak, implying that other factors (e.g. environmental conditions) are driving this interaction.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Wandering wetlands: spatial patterns of historical channel and floodplain change in the Ramsar-listed Macquarie Marshes, Australia 
Timothy J. Ralph, Paul P. Hesse and Tsuyoshi Kobayashi

Natural channel change has caused parts of the Macquarie Marshes to be abandoned in the 20th Century and other wetland areas to form. Historical analysis shows that natural wetland changes lead to anachronistic conservation reserve boundaries where reserves include only a small portion of the floodplain. Adaptive management is required to recognise the natural dynamics of floodplain wetlands within static conservation reserve systems.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Novel method for shark age estimation using near infrared spectroscopy 
C. L. Rigby, B. B. Wedding, S. Grauf and C. A. Simpfendorfer

Reliable age information is vital for effective shark fisheries management, yet traditional ageing has some limitations. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was investigated as an alternative approach using vertebrae from the great hammerhead and the spot-tail shark, the ages of which were validated to 10 years. NIRS successfully predicted their ages, is rapid and could be used to age large numbers of sharks quickly.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Algal composition and biomass in the tropical soda lake Chitu with focus on seasonal variability of Arthrospira fusiformis (Cyanophyta) 
Tadesse Ogato, Demeke Kifle and Brook Lemma

Functions of tropical soda lakes depend heavily on algae, particularly Arthrospira, which are the basis for understanding their ecological integrity. This study, which aimed at investigating the algal dynamics in one of the fragile tropical soda lakes, revealed the occurrence of considerable seasonality of algal biomass and Arthrospira abundance following changes in environmental factors. This suggests that algal seasonality may greatly affect the values of soda lakes.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Typhoon effects on phytoplankton responses in a semi-closed freshwater ecosystem 
Chia-Ying Ko, Chao-Chen Lai, Tzong-Yueh Chen, Huang-Hsiung Hsu and Fuh-Kwo Shiah

The effects of typhoons upon freshwater ecosystem remain unclear. We analysed a 2-year time series of phytoplankton responses with typhoon events and found a significantly increased phytoplankton response both during the typhoon periods and during the non-typhoon periods occurring between two typhoons. Given that phytoplankton plays an important role in assimilating CO2 and contributes to the sinking of atmospheric CO2 to the bottom of the water column, typhoon-induced phytoplankton blooms may additionally serve to mitigate local warming under climate change.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Reproductive biology of an endemic amphidromous goby, Cotylopus acutipinnis, from La Réunion Island 
Nils Teichert, Pierre Valade, Alexis Fostier, Henri Grondin and Philippe Gaudin

Amphidromous species represent a substantial part of freshwater fish diversity throughout the Indo-Pacific region, but knowledge of their life-history traits remains scarce. The reproductive biology of an endemic goby was investigated highlighting a high reproductive effort with multiple opportunities of spawning regulated by environmental cues. Knowledge of these demographic traits is essential for evaluate the species resilience and improve management strategy of insular rivers.

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Published online 21 July 2015
Aspects of the reproductive biology of dusky, spinner and sandbar sharks (Family Carcharhinidae) from the Tasman Sea 
Pascal T. Geraghty, William G. Macbeth and Jane E. Williamson

Declining shark stocks have emphasised the need for a greater understanding of commercially targeted species. Here we assess the reproductive biology of dusky, spinner and sandbar sharks in eastern Australian waters, where all three were found to be late maturing and of low reproductive output, indicative of a low resilience to fishing pressure. This research reinforces the importance of locally-derived parameters for stock assessment.

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Published online 13 July 2015
Controlling inputs from the land to sea: limit-setting, cumulative impacts and ki uta ki tai 
David R. Schiel and Clive Howard-Williams

There are increasing impacts of land-based activities on coastal waters, especially from nutrients and sediments, yet little effective policy specifically accommodating land-sea connections. This paper discusses holistic approaches to management using examples from New Zealand, including limit-setting and recognising time lags from groundwater and cumulative effects. Worldwide, renewed effort is needed with a very long-term perspective to ensure effective solutions.

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Published online 13 July 2015
Relative importance of physical and biological factors regulating tintinnid populations: a field study with frequent samplings in Sendai Bay, Japan 
Takehiro Kazama and Jotaro Urabe

Temporally high-frequency sampling was performed to examine rapid changes in the community composition of estuarine tintinnid ciliates. The dominant tintinnid species changed largely within several days due to changes in environmental and biological conditions. However, most tintinnid species were less vulnerable to predation pressure by copepods probably because there were many alternate prey to these predators.

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Published online 13 July 2015
Drill-cored rock pools: an effective method of ecological enhancement on artificial structures 
Ally J. Evans, Louise B. Firth, Stephen J. Hawkins, Elisabeth S. Morris, Harry Goudge and Pippa J. Moore

Coastal defences are proliferating in response to anticipated climate change and there is increasing need for ecologically sensitive design in their construction. In this study, drill-cored artificial rock pools enhanced the ecological condition of an intertidal breakwater and supported equivalent species richness to natural rock pools. These findings reveal the potential of drill-cored rock pools as an affordable and easily replicated means of enhancing biodiversity on a variety of coastal structures, both at the design stage and retrospectively.

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Published online 13 July 2015
Facing the future: the importance of substratum features for ecological engineering of artificial habitats in the rocky intertidal 
Louise B. Firth, Freya J. White, Meredith Schofield, Mick E. Hanley, Michael T. Burrows, Richard C. Thompson, Martin W. Skov, Ally J. Evans, Pippa J. Moore and Stephen J. Hawkins

Coastal defences are proliferating in response to climate change, leading to the creation of more vertical substrata. Diversity and abundance was higher on north-facing than on south-facing substrata. Grazing rates were greater on south-facing than north-facing substrata. These results highlight the importance of incorporating shaded habitats in the construction of artificial habitats.

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Published online 10 July 2015
Spatial and temporal variation of kelp forests and associated macroalgal assemblages along the Portuguese coast 
Daniela Pinho, Iacopo Bertocci, Francisco Arenas, João N. Franco, David Jacinto, João J. Castro, Raquel Vieira, Isabel Sousa-Pinto, Thomas Wernberg and Fernando Tuya

Distribution patterns of kelp communities were examined at three regions spanning a temperature and nutrient natural gradient along the Portuguese coast. Consistently through time, kelps were mostly found in the northern region, which separated from the central and the southern ones also in terms of associated assemblages. Kelp beds in southern Europe appear to be currently restricted to northern Portugal

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Published online 09 July 2015
Unravelling the impact of harvesting pressure on canopy-forming macroalgae 
Doriane Stagnol, Renaud Michel and Dominique Davoult

The effects of canopy removal on macrobenthic communities from rocky shores were examined, taking into account the matrix associated to the harvested canopy-forming macroalgae. The greatest effects of harvesting were observed for the species that created a dominant monospecific canopy prior to the disturbance. The results demonstrate the importance of implementing ecosystem-based management, assessing both the habitats conditions and ecological roles of targeted commercial species.

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Published online 09 July 2015
Phytoplankton dynamics in a subtropical tidal creek: influences of rainfall and water residence time on composition and biomass 
Susan Badylak, Edward Phlips, Nicole Dix, Jane Hart, Akeapot Srifa, Daniel Haunert, Zenli He, Jean Lockwood, Peter Stofella, Detong Sun and Yaugen Yang

Concerns about global climate change have heightened the role changing rainfall regimes play in altering plankton communities. In this study spatial and temporal patterns of phytoplankton composition and biomass in a sub-tropical tidal creek in Florida were observed over three wet and dry seasons. The results are discussed within the context of how variability in rainfall influence water residence times, nutrient concentrations and salinity regimes, which in turn influence phytoplankton.

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Published online 09 July 2015
A data-driven method for selecting candidate reference sites for stream bioassessment programs using generalised dissimilarity models 
P. M. Rose, M. J. Kennard, F. Sheldon, D. B. Moffatt and G. L. Butler

Selecting reference sites in highly modified landscapes is a key challenge for stream bioassessment practitioners. In this case study, generalised dissimilarity modelling was used to model fish species turnover as a function of GIS-based environmental variables to delineate ‘ecotypes’, identify influential human pressure variables and define and map candidate reference conditions. The method is transparent, indicator-specific and efficient, and complements existing procedures for defining reference conditions.

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Published online 09 July 2015
Assessing threats from coral and crustose coralline algae disease on the reefs of New Caledonia 
Greta Aeby, Aline Tribollet, Gregory Lasne and Thierry Work

Disease surveys on coral and crustose coralline algae were conducted on reefs in New Caledonia in 2010 and 2013. Thirty coral diseases affecting 15 coral genera were found with low overall disease prevalence (<1%). New host and biogeographic range extensions were found for several diseases including trematode infection in Porites. The potential ecological impact of individual coral diseases were assessed using an integrative scoring and relative ranking scheme.

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Published online 06 July 2015
The value of a broad temporal and spatial perspective in understanding dynamics of kelp forest ecosystems 
Daniel C. Reed, Andrew R. Rassweiler, Robert J. Miller, Henry M. Page and Sally J. Holbrook

Shallow temperate reefs are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth and they are threatened by numerous natural and human-induced pressures. We present four examples that demonstrate the value of a long-term broad-scale perspective in developing a predictive understanding of the complex ecology of giant kelp forests in southern California. Increasing the number of long-term ecological research programs in highly dynamic and valued ecosystems such as kelp forests is sure to pay great dividends towards improving our understanding of the causes and consequences of ecological change now and into the future.

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Published online 06 July 2015
Human impacts on connectivity in marine and freshwater ecosystems assessed using graph theory: a review 
Megan I. Saunders, Christopher J. Brown, Melissa M. Foley, Catherine M. Febria, Rebecca Albright, Molly G. Mehling, Maria T. Kavanaugh and Dana D. Burfeind

Humans are affecting how plants and animals move among their ecosystems. We reviewed studies that have analysed how humans affect the movement of plants and animals among river, lake and ocean habitats. Our review reveals that a wide range of human activities sometimes can similar affects on plant and animal movement, which suggests there are some common strategies managers can use to conserve plants and animals.

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Published online 06 July 2015
Feeding habits of range-shifting herbivores: tropical surgeonfishes in a temperate environment 
Alexander J. Basford, David A. Feary, Gary Truong, Peter D. Steinberg, Ezequiel M. Marzinelli and Adriana Vergés

A significant impact of ocean warming is the poleward movement of species’ distribution, including the movement of tropical herbivorous fishes into temperate algal-dominated reefs. Using aquarium feeding assays, we show that juvenile tropical surgeonfish display higher feeding rates than their warm-temperate counterparts, particularly in warmer temperatures. This may cause increased herbivory pressure on temperate reef algae as ocean temperatures rise and tropical species become more common.

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Published online 01 July 2015
A host-specific habitat former controls biodiversity across ecological transitions in a rocky intertidal facilitation cascade 
Mads S. Thomsen, Isis Metcalfe, Paul South and David R. Schiel

Few studies have quantified facilitation cascades across ecological transition zones or where the secondary facilitator is an obligate epiphyte. We quantified diversity of mobile invertebrates associated with the seaweed Hormosira banksii and its obligate epiphyte Notheia anomala at different elevations, seasons, diurnal cycles, and following an epiphyte-removal experiment. All tests showed positive density-dependent effects of Notheia on invertebrates, with strongest facilitation at the transition from intertidal to subtidal habitats suggesting that epiphyte-driven facilitation cascades are common in marine benthic systems.

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Published online 01 July 2015
Zinc and nickel binary mixtures act additively on the tropical mysid Mysidopsis juniae 
Lívia Pitombeira de Figuerêdo, Jeamylle Nilin, Allyson Queiroz da Silva, Évila Pinheiro Damasceno, Susana Loureiro and Letícia Veras Costa-Lotufo

Chemicals usually appear in the environment as mixtures. The aim of the present study was to assess nickel and zinc toxicity to Mysidopsis juniae and evaluate if their joint effects could be predicted by their single toxicity. Nickel showed to be more toxic than zinc and their mixture an additivity pattern. The present study highlights the need to assess combined effects in environmental scenarios.

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Published online 01 July 2015
DNA barcoding Australian macroinvertebrates for monitoring programs: benefits and current short comings 
Michael Shackleton and Gavin N. Rees

Molecular methods are gaining recognition as an improved approach to identify freshwater macroinvertebrates for research and monitoring programs, but are not applied widely in Australia. We applied DNA barcoding to specimens collected as part of monitoring programs and found that barcode data gave considerable informational benefit on macroinvertebrates. However, a lack of available sequence data for Australian freshwater fauna limited the scope of interpretation.

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Published online 29 June 2015
Comparative assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate diversity in irrigated rice fields and wetlands through different spatial scales: an additive partitioning approach 
Mateus Marques Pires, Carla Bender Kotzian, Marcia Regina Spies and Vanessa dos Anjos Baptista

Rice field and wetland macroinvertebrate beta diversity was compared at multiple spatial scales. In wetlands, hydrographic basin scale contributed the most to γ diversity. In rice fields, local different management practices were more important to diversity, which tends to homogenisation at broader scales. At least under drought climate conditions (ENSO phenomenon), only a small fraction of wetland community, mainly active dispersal taxa, was capable of colonising rice fields.

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Published online 29 June 2015
Age and growth dynamics of spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, in the Adriatic Sea (Eastern Mediterranean Sea) 
Romana Gračan, Scott A. Heppell, Gordana Lacković and Bojan Lazar

We provide first demographic parameters for endangered Mediterranean subpopulation of spiny dogfish, a commercially exploited mesopredatory shark, highly sensitive to overfishing. Our results, coming from the eastern Mediterranean basin (Adriatic Sea), suggest that the species exhibits extreme life history traits with low growth coefficients, very late sexual maturity and long life span, which intensify its vulnerability to overexploitation. This study provides critical data necessary to develop efficient, species-specific conservation strategy for the spiny dogfish in the region.

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Published online 23 June 2015
The hypoxia that developed in a microtidal estuary following an extreme storm produced dramatic changes in the benthos 
James R. Tweedley, Chris S. Hallett, Richard M. Warwick, K. Robert Clarke and Ian C. Potter

Runoff from an extreme storm led to the formation of a pronounced halocline and underlying hypoxia in the upper reaches of the microtidal Swan–Canning Estuary. The survival of annelids and loss of crustaceans during this time reflects the different sensitivities of these taxa. The results emphasise that microtidal estuaries are highly vulnerable to the effects of environmental perturbations.

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Published online 23 June 2015
Estimating the dynamics of spawning aggregations using biological and fisheries data 
André E. Punt, David C. Smith, Malcolm Haddon, Sarah Russell, Geoffrey N. Tuck and Tim Ryan

Acoustic surveys can estimate the biomass of marine fishes, but need to account for turnover of fish during the spawning season. A model is developed that estimates turnover based on changes in age, size and sex during the season. It can estimate the average proportion of the spawning biomass on the spawning grounds at any point in time.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Distribution and spatial modelling of a soft coral habitat in the Port Stephens–Great Lakes Marine Park: implications for management 
Davina E. Poulos, Christopher Gallen, Tom Davis, David J. Booth and David Harasti

This study explored the distribution of an uncommon soft coral species, Dendronephthya australis within the Port Stephens–Great Lakes Marine Park. D. australis colonies occurred along the southern shoreline in the Port Stephens estuary, but no colonies were found within marine park sanctuary (no-take) zones. Owing to its current threats, implications from this study will assist future management, particularly in regard to its protection within a marine park.

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Published online 22 June 2015
A test of metabolic and consumptive responses to local and global perturbations: enhanced resources stimulate herbivores to counter expansion of weedy species 
Chloe McSkimming, Bayden D. Russell, Jason E. Tanner and Sean D. Connell

Trophic compensation by herbivores negated the effect of local (nitrogen) and global pollution (CO2) on the expansion of algal turfs. This resource enrichment stimulated an increase in metabolic activity of herbivores so that the additional productivity of kelp competitors was consumed.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Transient effects of an invasive kelp on the community structure and primary productivity of an intertidal assemblage 
Paul M. South, Stacie A. Lilley, Leigh W. Tait, Tommaso Alestra, Michael J. H. Hickford, Mads S. Thomsen and David R. Schiel

The invasive kelp Undaria pinnatifida is one of the world's most successful invasive species and can become highly abundant in invaded ecosystems. We tested Undaria's effects on the structure and productivity of rocky intertidal assemblages in a long-term field experiment finding that Undaria had few overall effects on community composition, but doubled local primary production when it was abundant. This study highlights the importance of considering multiple ecological aspects of species' invasions when determining their impact and has broad relevance for invasion impact studies of Undaria and other canopy-forming macroalgae.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Climate-driven shifts in species' distributions may exacerbate the impacts of storm disturbances on North-east Atlantic kelp forests 
Dan A. Smale and Thomas Vance

Kelp forests are critical habitats in temperate seas, where they are often subjected to intense wave action. The winter storm season of 2013–14 in the North-east Atlantic was unusually severe, yet kelp forests in the south-west UK were high resilient to storm disturbance. However, a warm-water kelp appeared far more susceptible to storm damage than the dominant cold-water kelp, suggesting that climate-driven shifts in species abundances may erode the resilience of some kelp forests to physical disturbance.

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Published online 22 June 2015
The effect of elevated CO2 on autotrophic picoplankton abundance and production in a eutrophic lake (Lake Taihu, China) 
Shengnan Li, Jian Zhou, Lijun Wei, Fanxiang Kong and Xiaoli Shi

This is the first in situ seasonal study to investigate how freshwater autotrophic picoplankton responses to CO2 changes. CO2 elevation could significantly increase the abundance of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in all seasons except winter, but did not have any influence on picocyanobacterial abundance. This might cause a reduction of the transfer of matter and energy to higher trophic levels and an increase the importance of the microbial food web under high CO2 levels.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Genetic analyses reveal declining trends and low effective population size in an overfished South African sciaenid species, the dusky kob (Argyrosomus japonicus) 
Luca Mirimin, Brett Macey, Sven Kerwath, Stephen Lamberth, Aletta Bester-van der Merwe, Paul Cowley, Paulette Bloomer and Rouvay Roodt-Wilding

Overfishing has led to the collapse of many marine fish stocks. In this study, genetic markers were utilised to investigate population structure and genetic relatedness in an overfished South African fish species, the dusky kob. Results showed low genetic structuring and declining population trends, which should be taken into account for future management and conservation of depleted dusky kob populations.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Distribution and trophic dynamics of riparian tetragnathid spiders in a large river system 
Paradzayi Tagwireyi and S. Mažeika P. Sullivan

Riparian tetragnathid spiders are important components of river–riparian food webs. We assessed the influence of riparian habitat and emergent aquatic insects on tetragnathids along the Scioto River, OH, USA. We show that nearshore physical and biological characteristics can lead to alterations in tetragnathid distribution and trophic dynamics and their capacity to serve as a functional linkage between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

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Published online 22 June 2015
Triggering larval settlement behaviour and metamorphosis of the burrowing ghost shrimp, Lepidophthalmus siriboia (Callianassidae): do cues matter? 
Kácia Letícia de Noronha Campos, Fernando Araújo Abrunhosa and Darlan de Jesus de Brito Simith

Larval settlement and metamorphosis of many decapod species are triggered by physicochemical cues from the parental estuarine habitat. Here, we investigated whether the burrowing ghost shrimp (Lepidophthalmus siriboia) megalopae are stimulated by substrata and chemical cues from conspecific adults. Megalopal settlement and burrowing behaviour were induced by substrata, whereas metamorphosis to juvenile occurred irrespective of the presence or type of exogenous cues. Furthermore, megalopae developed significantly faster in the absence than the presence of substrata or conspecific stimuli. The independence of metamorphosis-stimulating cues shows important for colonisation and recovery of exploited callianassid populations.

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Published online 17 June 2015
How good are we at assessing the impact of ocean acidification in coastal systems? Limitations, omissions and strengths of commonly used experimental approaches with special emphasis on the neglected role of fluctuations 
M. Wahl, V. Saderne and Y. Sawall

Much of the past research on ocean acidification suffers from too simple experimental design. We present weak spots of many common approaches with a strong emphasis on the disregard of natural fluctuations. Experiments up scaled along the suggested dimensions are likely to provide more realistic results.

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Published online 17 June 2015
Diversity partitioning of a phytoplankton community in semiarid salterns 
Raiane S. Costa, Joseline Molozzi, Luiz U. Hepp, Renato M. Rocha and José E. L. Barbosa

This study was conducted in three salterns, with the goal to evaluate the diversity partitioning of phytoplankton along the saline gradient. At higher scales, the highest species richness was found between salt marshes; however, there was lower diversity and a decrease in similarity from the lower to the higher scale.

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Published online 01 June 2015
Relationship between otolith chemistry and age in a widespread pelagic teleost Arripis trutta: influence of adult movements on stock structure and implications for management 
Julian M. Hughes, John Stewart, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Damian Collins and Iain M. Suthers

Otolith chemistry analyses coupled with a strong latitudinal age gradient in the south-east Australian Arripis trutta population indicate that most fish originate in southern NSW, Victoria and Tasmania and move progressively northward with increasing age. Some recruitment occurs in northern NSW but these fish may not mix with immigrants from further south until they are more than 5 years old.

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Published online 29 May 2015
Substrate type affects the abundance and size of a coral-reef sponge between depths 
Alan R. Duckworth

Sponges on coral reefs generally grow on large pieces of rock or on smaller rubble pieces that are more easily moved by water flow. Investigating the interaction of substrate stability and water flow, this study found that sponges were most abundant and grew largest on rock, particularly at shallow depths where flow rates are highest. Natural and man-made factors that change substrate composition of coral reefs will affect numbers and sizes of sponges.

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Published online 28 May 2015
Cusps and butterflies: multiple stable states in marine systems as catastrophes 
P. S. Petraitis and S. R. Dudgeon

The theory of alternative stable states is often used to explain rapid and difficult to reverse shifts between different community states that commonly occur in ecosystems. Here this idea is re-examined in terms of catastrophe theory, a theory that has been largely overlooked by ecologists. The well-known hallmarks of catastrophes can provide new experimental tests for alternative states in nature.

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Published online 27 May 2015
Historical water-plant occurrence and environmental change in two contrasting catchments 
Michelle T. Casanova

Water-plant distribution is determined (in part) by water regime and salinity, so we can infer historical water regime and salinity from historical plant distribution. It was found that there were more records of drought-and salinity-tolerant plants along the Angas River and Tookayerta Creek in present-day surveys than in the past. Plant distribution, coupled with a knowledge of plant ecological requirements, can be informative about environmental conditions.

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Published online 27 May 2015
Improving our ability to collect eggs of the threatened Australian grayling, Prototroctes maraena 
F. Amtstaetter, D. Dawson and J. O'Connor

This research investigates whether sampling techniques for capturing eggs of the threatened Prototroctes maraena can be improved to monitor spawning success. Paired drift net sets (just below the surface versus on the bottom) were compared to identify that most eggs (90%) were captured on bottom and as a result egg density was higher. Recommendations are made for future sampling and implications for other species with negatively buoyant eggs discussed.

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Published online 25 May 2015
Variability of the carbonate chemistry in a shallow, seagrass-dominated ecosystem: implications for ocean acidification experiments 
Roberta C. Challener, Lisa L. Robbins and James B. McClintock

Few studies have characterised the carbonate chemistry of nearshore coastal zones. Over multiple timescales, we measured the pH and calculated the pCO2 of an area dominated by seagrass beds (Saint Joseph Bay, Florida). Our results indicate that diel fluctuations should be considered when designing ocean acidification experiments and that coastal species are experiencing far greater fluctuations in carbonate chemistry than previously thought.

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Published online 22 May 2015
UV radiation effects on the embryos of anchoveta (Engraulis ringens) and common sardine (Strangomera bentincki) off central Chile 
P. Vásquez, A. Llanos-Rivera, L. R. Castro and C. Fernandez

Observed levels of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation off central Chile (36°S, 73°W) indicate that planktonic fish embryos from anchoveta (Engraulis ringens) and common sardine (Strangomera bentincki) were exposed to harmful UVB radiation levels which in the field can cause a decrease in hatching success, embryonic malformations and changes in buoyancy.

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Published online 22 May 2015
Electrosensory-driven feeding behaviours of the Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) and western shovelnose ray (Aptychotrema vincentiana) 
R. M. Kempster, C. A. Egeberg, N. S. Hart and S. P. Collin

Interspecific variation in the elasmobranch electrosensory system remains poorly understood and as a result the functional consequences of such variation are unknown. Here, we directly tested the electrosensitivity of two benthic elasmobranchs that share a similar habitat and diet, but differ significantly in their electrosensory system morphology. The results suggest that differences in abundance and distribution of electrosensory pores have little to no effect on the absolute electrical sensitivity, and instead, may reflect species-specific differences in the spatial resolution and directionality of electroreception.

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Published online 21 May 2015
Bottlenose dolphin communities from the southern Brazilian coast: do they exchange genes or are they just neighbours? 
Ana Paula Borges Costa, Pedro Fruet, Fábio Gonçalves Daura-Jorge, Paulo César Simões-Lopes, Paulo Henrique Ott, Victor Hugo Valiati and Larissa Rosa de Oliveira

The genetic structure of bottlenose dolphin communities found along the southern Brazilian coast reveals the presence of three distinct clusters, with low gene flow between dolphins of Laguna and those from outside the estuary. Despite the movement of some individuals among the areas, significant genetic structure between dolphins was observed even among those from nearby estuaries (~219 km apart). Most of the stranded samples were revealed to be part of a possible offshore population (Cluster 3) with high levels of genetic diversity, whereas the others specimens were divided into two coastal groups (Cluster 1 and Cluster 2)

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Published online 21 May 2015
Phosphorus speciation, transformation and retention in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China 
Xiang-bin Ran, Hong-tao Chen, Jun-feng Wei, Qing-zhen Yao, Tie-zhu Mi and Zhi-gang Yu

Phosphorus is vulnerable to the artificial lake, and sensitive to aquatic ecosystems. Phosphorus dynamics in a huge reservoir should be well documented, and the Three Gorges Reservoir exerts important influence on phosphorus speciation and transport. This study will improve our understanding of the mechanisms and processes responsible for the effect of artificial lake with a unique gradual mode of impoundment.

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Published online 21 May 2015
Diversity and abundance of epibiota on invasive and native estuarine gastropods depend on substratum and salinity 
Jakob Thyrring, Mads Solgaard Thomsen, Ane Kirstine Brunbjerg and Thomas Wernberg

What drives variation in estuarine epibiota community structure? By testing relationships among multiple environmental factors, various biogenic substrates and the richness and abundance of epibiota, this study investigates possible underlying drivers of variation in epibiotic communities. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of including multiple environmental factors in future studies to provide better prediction of the distribution and changes of epibiota communities.

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    | Supplementary Material (220 KB)
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Published online 12 May 2015
Condition of larvae of western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus) in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies of the Leeuwin Current off Western Australia 
Miao Wang, Richard O'Rorke, Anya M. Waite, Lynnath E. Beckley, Peter Thompson and Andrew G. Jeffs

A recent dramatic decline in the settlement of post-larvae of the Western Australian spiny lobster may be due to changes in the offshore oceanographic processes. This research reported that late-stage phyllosomas of spiny lobster in cyclonic eddies of the Leeuwin Current are in a substantially better nutritional condition than are those in anticyclonic eddies. These differences may be related to differences in water temperatures and would influence their settlement.

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Published online 12 May 2015
Growth and spatiotemporal distribution of juvenile shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) in the western and central North Pacific 
M. Kai, K. Shiozaki, S. Ohshimo and K. Yokawa

Growth and spatiotemporal distribution of juvenile shortfin mako provide valuable information on their potential productivity, mechanisms of recruitment and movement. The aims of this study were to estimate the growth and to explore the distribution. The shortfin mako growth was faster than previously reported – sharks were born during autumn and winter off the coast of north-eastern Japan, and gradually expanded their habitat eastward and northward.

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Published online 12 May 2015
Ciguatera toxins in wild coral reef fish along the southern coast of China 
Ni Wu, Qingliu Huan, Kemei Du, Rong Hu and Tian-jiu Jiang

Ciguatera fish poisoning is frequent in southern coastal China. Ciguatera toxins (CTXs) in wild coral reef fish collected from the southern coast of China were analysed, and 47.8% of the samples were confirmed to be contaminated with CTXs. There was no significant correlation between fish toxicity and fish weight, length and feeding habits. The present study posed a huge question concerning the management of ciguatera toxins in China.

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Published online 07 May 2015
Shifts in shell mineralogy and metabolism of Concholepas concholepas juveniles along the Chilean coast 
Laura Ramajo, Alejandro B. Rodríguez-Navarro, Carlos M. Duarte, Marco A. Lardies and Nelson A. Lagos

Our study proposes that metabolism and proportion of calcite and aragonite are tightly related, being sensitive to changes in environmental parameters and varying geographically where calcite is favoured over aragonite toward high latitudes.

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Published online 04 May 2015
High sediment temperatures influence the emergence of dormant aquatic biota 
Daryl L. Nielsen, Elke Walburga Jasper, Nathan Ning and Susan Lawler

Many wetland plants and invertebrates in wetland communities survive the dry periods as dormant seeds and eggs. We determined that the viability of seeds decreased at temperatures at above 50°C and for invertebrates at temperatures at above 40°C. These results indicate that changes to sediment temperature during the dry phase of wetlands may play an important role in influencing communities of wetland plants and invertebrates.

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Published online 04 May 2015
First observations of dusky sharks (Carcharhinus obscurus) attacking a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) calf 
M. L. Dicken, A. A. Kock and M. Hardenberg

This study provides the first direct observations of dusky sharks attacking a humpback whale calf. Although the bites, from up to 20 dusky sharks, were superficial, the whale calf eventually drowned from stress and exhaustion. These observations provide a new insight into the potential threat that dusky sharks may pose to whale calves.

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Published online 04 May 2015
Age determination and growth estimation from otolith micro-increments and fin spine sections of blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) in the western North Pacific 
Tamaki Shimose, Kotaro Yokawa and Katsunori Tachihara

Although age and growth of blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) have been studied for decades, no results are generally accepted to date. The present study described the growth of blue marlin from juvenile to adult stages using otolith micro-increment and sectioned fin spine analyses first time. Obtained results will largely improve the stock assessment of the species.

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Published online 04 May 2015
The productivity of the macroinvertebrate prey of the platypus in the upper Shoalhaven River, New South Wales 
R. Marchant and T. R. Grant

No attempt has been made to link the energy demands of platypuses with the productivity of their invertebrate prey. In the upper Shoalhaven River, New South Wales, we measured total invertebrate production of 7.8 to 13.1 g DW m–2 year–1 over 2 years. These levels of production were sufficient to support 20–34 platypuses along a 1.5-km reach of the river

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Published online 27 April 2015
Can top-down and bottom-up forces explain phytoplankton structure in a subtropical and shallow groundwater-connected lake? 
Diego Frau, Melina Devercelli, Susana José de Paggi, Pablo Scarabotti, Gisela Mayora, Yamila Battauz and Mariana Senn

Top down–bottom up is one of the major hypotheses that explain aquatic communities’ structure. In this study we aim to prove it in a subtropical shallow lake using phytoplankton as study object. We realised that phytoplankton is mainly regulated by hydrological changes that affect nutrient availability and predation. Evidence suggest that top down–bottom up model is not completely valid for shallow subtropical lakes where new models should be fashioned.

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Published online 27 April 2015
Long-term ecological trends of flow-dependent ecosystems in a major regulated river basin 
Matthew J. Colloff, Peter Caley, Neil Saintilan, Carmel A. Pollino and Neville D. Crossman

Analyses of ecological time series in the Murray–Darling Basin (1905–2013) indicated periods of decline and recovery according to cycles of drought and flood. Meta-analysis revealed a small, but statistically significant declining trend, consistent with a pattern of historical decline to a hybrid ecosystem followed by slow, recent decline for some components and stability for others.

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Published online 23 April 2015
Low survival rather than breeding success explains little penguin population decline on Granite Island 
Diane Colombelli-Négrel

Little penguin populations have been seriously declining across South Australia, for reasons still not fully understood. I investigated breeding performance and survival of little penguins on Granite Island for 17 years and found that both adult and sub-adult survivals were extremely low, with sub-adult survival being the most critical variable affecting population growth. Further investigation into factors influencing juvenile mortality is clearly needed, with a particular focus on food availability and parasites, which are known reasons for poor juvenile survival in other colonies.

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Published online 22 April 2015
Significant genetic structure despite high vagility revealed through mitochondrial phylogeography of an Australian freshwater turtle (Chelodina longicollis) 
K. Hodges, S. Donnellan and A. Georges

The turtle Chelodina longicollis is a freshwater obligate with strong overland dispersal capacity and adaptations to terrestriality – traits that connect populations and reduce divergence. Genetic results showed two ancient haplogroups partitioned either side of the Great Dividing Range, each with demographically stable subpopulations and signals of isolation by distance. These results demonstrate that that landscape history can overwhelm life-history traits even in a highly vagile species.

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    | Supplementary Material (326 KB)
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Published online 22 April 2015
Phylogenetic diversity within the endemic brown trout Duero lineage: implications for conservation and management 
M. Vera, J. L. García-Marín, P. Martinez and C. Bouza

Populations from an endemic lineage out of its reported natural range difficult the management of species diversity. The phylogeny of mtDNA sequences demonstrated the natural origin of the brown trout populations of the Duero lineage outside the Duero basin, and refused its origin from recent human translocations. This lineage singularity into the north-western Iberian rivers will require differentiated management from Duero lineage populations inside the Duero basin.

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Published online 09 April 2015
Glassfish switch feeding from thalassinid larvae to crab zoeae after tidal inundation of saltmarsh 
Jack J. McPhee, Peter Freewater, William Gladstone, Margaret E. Platell and Maria J. Schreider

The release of free-swimming larvae (zoeae) by saltmarsh-dwelling crabs after tidal flooding of saltmarsh provides important food sources for estuarine fish, including glassfish. On ebbing tides in a temperate Australian estuary, glassfish fed on zoeae following saltmarsh flooding, but when tides flooded only the adjacent mudflats, ghost shrimp larvae were the main prey. The feeding of glassfish is therefore triggered by tidal action and the ingestion of prey is influenced by which coastal estuarine habitats are flooded by incoming tides

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Published online 09 April 2015
Range and habitat associations of the native macroalga Caulerpa filiformis in New South Wales, Australia 
Tim M. Glasby, Peter. T. Gibson, Gregory West, Peter Davies and Sofietje Voerman

The native seaweed Caulerpa filiformis has reportedly been spreading over rocky reefs throughout NSW. We document the extent of C. filiformis over 5 years and test whether the seaweed is associated with nutrient enrichment and particular habitat types. C. filiformis is predominately found where there is a mixture of rocky reefs and beaches and is not closely associated with human activities or nutrient levels over large areas.

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Published online 09 April 2015
New opportunities for conservation of a threatened biogenic habitat: a worldwide assessment of knowledge on bivalve-reef representation in marine and coastal Ramsar Sites 
Tim Kasoar, Philline S. E. zu Ermgassen, Alvar Carranza, Boze Hancock and Mark Spalding

Bivalve reef has recently been listed under the Ramsar Convention (1971), thereby requiring reporting of its presence. The present study aimed to assess the current state of knowledge of bivalve reef represented in Ramsar Information Sheets, and found that only 2% of Sites reported the presence of bivalve reef, whereas 16% of Sites were identified using other data sources. These Sites should be a priority for surveys to confirm the presence or absence of this important marine habitat.

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Published online 09 April 2015
Electroreception in the obligate freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro 
Lindsay L. Harris, Christine N. Bedore and Stephen M. Kajiura

Little is known about the sensitivity of freshwater elasmobranchs to minute electric fields produced by their prey. This study determined that the obligate freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, is up to 5 orders of magnitude less sensitive to electric fields than its marine relatives. Despite decreased electrosensitivity, P. motoro still successfully localises prey owing to multiple sensory systems working synergistically.

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Published online 07 April 2015
Reproductive capacity of a marine species (Octopus tetricus) within a recent range extension area 
Jorge E. Ramos, Gretta T. Pecl, Jayson M. Semmens, Jan M. Strugnell, Rafael I. León and Natalie A. Moltschaniwskyj

Marine species undertaking range shifts in response to environmental change must produce viable gametes and their offspring must survive in new areas. Examination of reproductive characteristics suggests that Octopus tetricus can reproduce and the population may be self-sustainable within its new range in south-eastern Australia. The reproductive biology of O. tetricus may thus facilitate the establishment and prevalence of the population in the new environments.

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    | Supplementary Material (73 KB)
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Published online 07 April 2015
Importance of predation and viral lysis for bacterial mortality in a tropical western Indian coral-reef ecosystem (Toliara, Madagascar) 
M. Bouvy, P. Got, Y. Bettarel, T. Bouvier, C. Carré, C. Roques, M. Rodier, J. C. Lope and R. Arfi

Viral lysis may be a major cause of mortality and, at times, comparable to grazing-induced mortality. We compare the two distinct processes of bacterial mortality in two different trophic conditions using natural populations. Changes in nutrient concentrations can play an important role in the balance between viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing in the bacterial mortality.

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Published online 07 April 2015
Effects of gear type, entrance size and soak time on trap efficiency for freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor and C. albidus 
Paul Brown, Taylor L. Hunt and Khageswor Giri

We aimed to compare relative efficiencies of six gears where an array of restrictive recreational fishing regulations are in place for freshwater crayfish. Open topped traps and those fitted with fixed entrance rings, to reduce by-catch entry, were most efficient particularly when fished actively with short soak-times. Encouragingly, fixed entrance rings didn’t affect catch efficiency or size-structure.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Variability in the growth, feeding and condition of barramundi (Lates calcarifer Bloch) in a northern Australian coastal river and impoundment 
D. J. Russell, F. E. Thomson, P. A. Thuesen, T. N. Power and R. J. Mayer

Growth of stocked and wild Lates calcarifer in some north Queensland habitats was both seasonal and prey-dependent. In the lower, freshwater Johnstone River, where larger prey appeared depauperate, L. calcarifer grew slower relative to those in downstream estuarine and adjacent coastal areas and in nearby Lake Tinaroo. Growth of L. calcarifer was highly seasonal with marked declines during the cooler months.

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Published online 01 April 2015
River metabolism and carbon dynamics in response to flooding in a lowland river 
Robert A. Cook, Ben Gawne, Rochelle Petrie, Darren S. Baldwin, Gavin N. Rees, Daryl L. Nielsen and Nathan S. P. Ning

Floodwater returning from floodplains can contain large amounts of carbon, but it’s not well understood whether or not this carbon is involved in the carbon budgets of rivers. We examined carbon dynamics upstream and downstream of a river red gum forest, before and after a flood inundated the forest and returned to the river. The flood waters led to a major increase in the carbon budget of the river and the carbon was processed by riverine biofilms, showing carbon from the floodplain can fuel river foodwebs.

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    | Supplementary Material (216 KB)
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Published online 01 April 2015
Sea-surface temperature used to predict the relative density of giant Pacific octopuses (Enteroctopus dofleini) in intertidal habitats of Prince William Sound, Alaska 
D. Scheel

I used targeted visual surveys to study giant Pacific octopuses, Enteroctopus dofleini, an important by-catch species in pot fisheries in Alaska. I found a significant negative correlation of octopus counts with winter sea-surface temperatures over the past 30 months. Environmental variables affecting recruitment together with visual surveys may allow better prediction of trends in octopus abundance than by-catch statistics.

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Published online 01 April 2015
The association between coral communities and disease assemblages in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, south-eastern Sulawesi, Indonesia 
J. Haapkylä, J. Melbourne-Thomas and M. Flavell

The Coral Triangle, including Indonesia, is a hotspot for coral reef diversity, but the effects of coral disease in this region are poorly understood. This study reports changes in coral cover and disease prevalence in a remote part of Indonesia, and relates these changes to features of the coral community. Declines in coral cover and increases in both the number of diseases and overall disease prevalence over a 7-year period underlie potential changes in coral communities in this biodiversity hotspot.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Spatial and temporal habitat use by white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) at an aggregation site in southern New Zealand 
Malcolm P. Francis, Clinton Duffy and Warrick Lyon

White sharks aggregating at fur seal colonies near Stewart Island, southern New Zealand, were tagged to identify their temporal and spatial patterns of occupancy, and to inform management measures that aim to separate sharks from fishing effort. White sharks were present from late summer to early winter, peaking in autumn (March–June). The population comprised mainly subadult and adult males and subadult females, and individual sharks showed fine-scale spatial and temporal variability in abundance. These sharks travel well beyond their aggregation sites, but the behaviour and dynamics of white sharks in other parts of New Zealand remain poorly understood.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Resilience to climate change: complex relationships among wetland hydroperiod, larval amphibians and aquatic predators in temporary wetlands 
Katrin Lowe, J. Guy Castley and Jean-Marc Hero

The environmental factors influencing breeding of a temporary wetland breeding frog (Litoria olongburensis) from eastern Australia were examined. The species showed breeding flexibility in response to highly variable and unpredictable rainfall conditions. This flexibility may reflect an adaptive capacity to predicted changes in frequency and reliability of precipitation as a result of climate change, and may apply to other temporary wetland species.

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    | Supplementary Material (240 KB)
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Published online 19 March 2015
High clonality in Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis populations of Guadeloupe, French Lesser Antilles 
A. Japaud, C. Bouchon, J.-L. Manceau and C. Fauvelot

In Guadeloupe, the two endangered Acropora species are critically declining, like in the rest of Caribbean reefs. While examining the genetic status of two main remnant populations, we found an extremely high clonality in both species. This is alarming in the context of ongoing global warming as long periods of clonal growth without sexual recruitment may lead to the extinction of these populations.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Soft bodies make estimation hard: correlations among body dimensions and weights of multiple species of sea cucumbers 
James Prescott, Shijie Zhou and Andhika P. Prasetyo

Sound management of sea cucumber fisheries requires biological information including body measurements. We used hierarchical Bayesian errors-in-variables models to establish correlations among three types of weight measures and two body dimensions. The results can be applied to sea cucumbers in other areas and can be useful for data standardisation and size-based fisheries management.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Mobulid ray by-catch in longline fisheries in the south-western Atlantic Ocean 
F. Mas, R. Forselledo and A. Domingo

This paper presents the first by-catch assessment of mobulid rays in pelagic longline fisheries over the south-western Atlantic. At least two species were indentified and, although by-catch frequency was low, some uncertainties remained regarding their post-capture mortality. This work sheds light on mobulids’ interaction with longline fisheries, expands known distribution ranges, and raises concern about the potential effect of these fisheries on mobulid populations.

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    | Supplementary Material (859 KB)
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Published online 19 March 2015
Artificial irrigation ponds and sea coast as foraging habitat for larids breeding in protected wetlands 
Esther Sebastián-González, Francisco Botella, Otso Ovaskainen, Antonio Delgado and José Antonio Sánchez-Zapata

Questions related to the preservation of foraging sites of breeding birds have received little attention, although they can be of major importance for population persistence. Here, we used stable isotopes and field observations to evaluate the relative importance of man-made irrigation ponds as foraging areas for a larid community of conservation concern. Our study showed that larids breeding in mixed colonies segregate spatially in their foraging niche between marine and freshwater environments. Both breeding and foraging habitats need to be addressed when analysing larid population dynamics and conservation strategies.

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    | Supplementary Material (261 KB)
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Published online 19 March 2015
Patterns of connectivity and population structure of the southern calamary Sepioteuthis australis in southern Australia 
Timothy M. Smith, Corey P. Green and Craig D. H. Sherman

Southern calamary are an important fisheries species and understanding levels of connectivity across their distribution is important for management purposes. Genetic discrimination techniques suggested that there is a high level of gene flow and connectivity throughout their distribution. Such results indicate the southern calamary population has the potential to maintain a level of resilience to altering conditions if large scale mixing is maintained.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Year-round maturity of the chaetognath Aidanosagitta regularis in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand 
Wesley H. Webb and Mary A. Sewell

The reproductive biology of planktonic chaetognaths is poorly known, particularly with regard to the importance of seasonal factors. We undertook a year of semilunar plankton sampling in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, to survey sexual maturity of Aidanosagitta regularis; surprisingly, breeding of A. regularis appeared unconstrained by seasonal factors, as reproductively mature individuals were available year-round. This has implications for embryological study of the chaetognaths.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Lake Eyre golden perch (Macquaria sp.) spawning and recruitment is enhanced by flow events in the hydrologically variable rivers of Lake Eyre Basin, Australia 
B. J. Cockayne, D. Sternberg, D. W. Schmarr, A. W. Duguid and R. Mathwin

Understanding the links between fish recruitment and riverine flows is integral for setting priorities for river-management strategies. We found that within-channel flow events soon after months of no-flow were important spawning triggers for the endemic Lake Eyre golden perch (Macquaria sp.). Subsequent fish recruitment was also strongly associated with the number of flow-events per year. These results highlight the importance of maintaining the naturally variable flow regime of Australia’s arid- and semi-arid zone rivers.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Behavioural responses to simulated bird attacks in marine three-spined sticklebacks after exposure to high CO2 levels 
Joacim Näslund, Erik Lindström, Floriana Lai and Fredrik Jutfelt

Ocean acidification (OA), caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the sea water, has previously been reported to affect the behaviour of fishes. Here, we find that some behaviours (lateralisation and freezing) were affected by OA in three-spined sticklebacks, but the general response to a bird predator (spatial avoidance) was not affected. Thus, the general avoidance behaviour appears to be robust to elevated CO2 levels, despite some behaviours being altered.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Activity, substrate selection, and effect of a simulated Amazon flood regime on the behaviour of the apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii 
Timoteo Tadashi Watanabe, Gustavo Yomar Hattori and Bruno Sampaio Sant'Anna

The present study investigated the behaviour of the apple snail Pomacea bridgesii on a simulated flood-pulse water regime. The results show that there are differences between day and night behaviours (activity and substrate selection). There were also differences between behaviours in dry and maximum water-level periods. Therefore, the floodplain regime influences the activity of P. brigesii displaying adaptations to minimise water loss.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Temperature, length of growth season and phytoplankton abundance in the Gulf of Maine 
Knut Seip

Does global warming of the sea surface decrease or increase phytoplankton abundance? This paper shows that, although within-season phytoplankton abundance decreases with increasing water temperature, annual average phytoplankton abundance increases with average water temperature, likely because an increase of 1°C lengthens the growth season by ~20 days. However, it is not known if higher annual average phytoplankton abundance translates into larger stocks of zooplankton and fish.

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Published online 19 March 2015
The influence of water quality on hyporheic invertebrate communities in agricultural catchments 
Samuel Kibichii, Hugh B. Feeley, Jan-Robert Baars and Mary Kelly-Quinn

Understanding the role of agriculture in water quality and river health is vital. This study investigated the effect of agricultural run-off on the chemical and biological status of the hyporheic zone, and indicates that hyporheic zones are degraded in intensely farmed catchments. These findings emphasise the importance of holistic catchment management in the protection and sustainability of freshwater systems.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Spatial variation in life-history traits of Oithona spp. in a shallow temperate estuarine system (Río de la Plata, south-west Atlantic) during spring 
G. D. Cepeda, R. P. Di Mauro, M. C. Hozbor, D. Cucchi Colleoni, D. Hernández and M. D. Viñas

Oithona nana and O. helgolandica population dynamics and the influence of physical and trophic factors were studied at an estuarine system. O. nana proliferates near river runoff, mainly because a retention mechanism and a potential ecological advantage of this species denoted in body size and egg number and size. O. helgolandica populations did not increase in this system.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Breeding habitat selection in an obligate beach bird: a test of the food resource hypothesis 
Anna Cuttriss, Grainne S. Maguire, Glenn Ehmke and Michael A. Weston

One beach is not the same as another as far as a beach nesting-bird, the Hooded Plover, is concerned. They breed in sites with more invertebrate prey, and which have different assemblages of prey species, compared with sites where they do not breed. Thus, beaches apparently vary in terms of their ability to support this threatened bird species.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Influence of boat anchoring on Pinna nobilis: a field experiment using mimic units 
Maite Vázquez-Luis, Joseph A. Borg, Carlos Morell, Gàlia Banach-Esteve and Salud Deudero

The effect of boat anchoring on the Mediterranean endemic bivalve Pinna nobilis was assessed experimentally in the field by deploying non-biological mimic units. Boat anchoring influence was three times higher in affected than in control areas, having also an adverse effect on Posidonia oceanica meadows. Moreover, lower values of natural P. nobilis density and size classes were recorded from the affected areas.

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Published online 13 March 2015
Biomonitoring of the environmental contamination by organotins in the Gulf of Tunis: occurrence of imposex in Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767) 
Wafa Boulajfene, Jihen Boukhicha, Alan Deidun, Daniela Berto, Teresa Romeo, Oum Kalthoum Ben Hassine and Sabiha Tlig-Zouari

Imposex is mainly caused by organotins’ accumulation in gastropods tissues. This research aimed to study the imposex in of Stramonita haemastoma individuals collected along the rocky coastline of the Gulf of Tunis. Sexual modifications occurred to different degrees in all stations essentially close to harbours. An inverse relationship between the distances from harbours and the occurrence of imposex was observed.

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blank image Marine and Freshwater Research
Volume 66 Number 8 2015

 
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Marine plastic pollution: using community science to address a global problem 
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Paul. E. Duckett and Vincenzo Repaci
pp. 665-673

Plastic pollution has become a global problem for marine ecosystems in recent decades. However, to resolve this environmental disaster will require changing the attitudes and lifestyles of people. Here we engaged a community to highlight the high levels of plastics that exist on their local beaches in an attempt to inspire local change.

 
  
 

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Temporal dynamics of allochthonous coarse particulate organic matter in a subtropical Atlantic rainforest Brazilian stream 
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Leonardo Kleba Lisboa , Aurea Luiza Lemes da Silva , Ana Emilia Siegloch , José Francisco Gonçalves Júnior and Mauricio Mello Petrucio
pp. 674-680

We quantified and identified the allochthonous leaf litter entering a headwater Atlantic Rain Forest stream throughout 1 year. We found that most organic matter entered the stream by a lateral input pathway, driven mainly by precipitation, as well as by changes to the leaf litter input of tree species throughout the year.

 
    | Supplementary Material (374 KB)
 

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Re-evaluation of the diversity and distribution of diazotrophs in the South China Sea by pyrosequencing the nifH gene 
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Peng Xiao , Yongguang Jiang , Yang Liu , Wenhua Tan , Wenhua Li and Renhui Li
pp. 681-691

In this study, pyrosequencing was used to investigate the diversity and composition of putative diazotrophs in the South China Sea. The result showed that Trichodesmium and γ-proteobacteria were the two dominant species among the putative N2-fixing microorganism community. The predominance of the two genotypes in the South China Sea contributed to low diversity of putative diazotrophs.

 
    | Supplementary Material (938 KB)
 

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Evidence for a broad-scale decline in giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) abundance from non-targeted survey data 
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Thomas A. A. Prowse , Bronwyn M. Gillanders , Barry W. Brook , Anthony J. Fowler , Karina C. Hall , Michael A. Steer , Camille Mellin , N. Clisby , Jason E. Tanner , Tim M. Ward and Damien A. Fordham
pp. 692-700

The breeding aggregation of the giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) in northern Spencer Gulf, Southern Australia, has declined dramatically since the turn of the century. Our analysis of long-term by-catch and harvest records for the population indicated that this trend was not due to the failure of the species to aggregate, nor due to the aggregation occurring elsewhere, but was part of a systemic decline in the abundance of the population over this period. We evaluated a suite of potential climatic and harvest-related stressors for this species but could not attribute this decline in abundance to specific causes.

 
    | Supplementary Material (478 KB)
 

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The dynamics of attached and free-living bacterial population in tropical coastal waters 
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Siew Wen Lee , Choon Weng Lee , Chui Wei Bong , Kumaran Narayanan and Edmund Ui-Hang Sim
pp. 701-710

Attached bacteria can play a major role in carbon and nutrient cycling but their importance differs among habitats. We investigated the dynamics of attached and free-living bacteria in the coastal waters of Malaysia, and found that attached bacteria formed a larger fraction of total bacteria in eutrophic relative to oligotrophic waters, and showed a preference for chlorophyll-a based particles.

 
  
 

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Water level decrease and increased water stability promotes phytoplankton growth in a mesotrophic subtropical lake 
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Eduardo V. Fuentes and Mauricio M. Petrucio
pp. 711-718

Understanding the mechanisms that favour increase in phytoplankton biomass and bloom formation in freshwater ecosystems is a major challenge for managers and researchers, especially in environments dominated by cyanobacteria. Based on 5 years of observation, our study evaluated the importance of climatic factors in determining environmental conditions such as water level and mixing regime in a subtropical lake used for public water supply. The results show the importance of daily stratifications events for the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass.

 
    | Supplementary Material (353 KB)
 

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Mesozooplankton community in a seasonally hypoxic and highly eutrophic bay 
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Min-Chul Jang , Kyoungsoon Shin , Pung-Guk Jang , Woo-Jin Lee and Keun-Hyung Choi
pp. 719-729

Low summer oxygen in a highly eutrophic and seasonally hypoxic coastal bay was attributed to high phytoplankton stocks, together with high temperature and stratification of the water column. A distinct mesozooplankton community was identified in summer of large freshwater discharge. The abundance of a marine cladoceran was positively related to oxygen levels, suggesting that hypoxic conditions may have lethal or sublethal effects.

 
  
 

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Important sources of variation to be considered when using fin clips as a surrogate for muscle in trophic studies using stable isotopes 
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David E. Galván , Manuela Funes , Ana L. Liberoff , Florencia Botto and Oscar O. Iribarne
pp. 730-738

Sampling muscle is the prevalent technique for stable isotope analysis in fish and typically involves the death of the individuals. Fin-clipping is a non-lethal, easy-to-implement sampling technique that preserves fish welfare. This study assessed the suitability of caudal fin as a replacement for muscle in trophic studies. Results support the use of caudal fin as a surrogate for muscle but also showed that fin-muscle relationship varies among species and it is affected by fish size.

 
  
 

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Community structure of reef fishes on a remote oceanic island (St Peter and St Paul’s Archipelago, equatorial Atlantic): the relative influence of abiotic and biotic variables 
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Osmar J. Luiz , Thiago C. Mendes , Diego R. Barneche , Carlos G. W. Ferreira , Ramon Noguchi , Roberto C. Villaça , Carlos A. Rangel , João L. Gasparini and Carlos E. L. Ferreira
pp. 739-749

Reef-fish communities on large coral-reef systems are incredible complex; in contrast, isolated oceanic islands represent an opportunity to understand processes on ecologically simpler ecosystems. This study investigated the reef-fish community of the world’s smallest tropical oceanic island and found that environmental drivers, especially depth, are more important than biotic interactions in its organisation, probably because of low species-richness. The low-species richness translates in low functional redundancy, indicating that remote islands may be more vulnerable to human impacts than interconnected reef systems.

 
    | Supplementary Material (851 KB)
 

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Food preferences of the estuarine crab Sesarma catenata estimated through laboratory experiments 
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Leandro Bergamino and Nicole B. Richoux
pp. 750-756

Laboratory feeding-preference experiments showed that the estuarine crab Sesarma catenata preferred decomposed leaves of terrestrial riparian trees, followed by decomposed and mature leaves of the marshgrass Spartina maritima. The relative low carbon : nitrogen ratios of S. maritima and high bacterial production associated with decomposed terrestrial leaves may explain the trophic behaviour of S. catenata.

 
  
 

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Corrigendum to: All good things come in threes – species delimitation through shape analysis of saccular, lagenar and utricular otoliths 
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Tanja Schulz-Mirbach and Martin Plath
pp. 757-757
 
 |    Corrigendum PDF (401 KB) - $25.00  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    MF15069  Accepted 31 July 2015
    New parameterization method for 3D otolith surface images
    Pere Marti-Puig, Jaume Danés, Amàlia Manjabacas, Antoni Lombarte
    Abstract


    MF15232  Accepted 31 July 2015
    The 'Great Southern Reef': socio-ecological and economic value of Australia's neglected kelp forests
    Scott Bennett, Thomas Wernberg, Sean Connell, Alistair Hobday, Craig Johnson, Elvira Poloczanska
    Abstract


    MF14346  Accepted 30 July 2015
    Finding the needle in the haystack: comparing sampling methods for detecting an endangered freshwater fish
    Mark Lintermans
    Abstract


    MF15193  Accepted 30 July 2015
    The Potential Effects of Anthropogenic Climate Change on Evaporation from Water Storage Reservoirs within the Lockyer Catchment, South-East Queensland, Australia
    Ryan McGloin, Hamish McGowan, David McJannet
    Abstract


    MF15086  Accepted 23 July 2015
    Otolith shape variation provides a marker of stock origin for North Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus)
    Deirdre Brophy, Paula Haynes, Haritz Arrizabalaga, Igaratza Fraile, Jean Fromentin, Fulvio Garibaldi, Ivan Katavic, Fausto Tinti, David Macías, F Saadet Karakulak, Dheeraj Busawon, Alex Hanke, Ai Kimoto, Osamu Sakai, Simeon Deguara, Nouredinne Abid, Miguel Santos
    Abstract


    MF15072  Accepted 22 July 2015
    Spatiotemporal dynamics of intermittent stream fish metacommunities in response to prolonged drought and re-connectivity
    Lucas Driver, David Hoeinghaus
    Abstract


    MF15108  Accepted 20 July 2015
    Big data opportunities and challenges for assessing multiple stressors across scales in aquatic ecosystems.
    Katherine Dafforn, Emma Johnston, Angus Ferguson, Chris Humphrey, Wendy Monk, Susan Nichols, Stuart Simpson, Mirela Tulbure, Donald Baird
    Abstract


    MF15098  Accepted 18 July 2015
    Lobster in a Bottle – A novel technique for observing the predation of juvenile spiny lobster, Jasus edwardsii
    Jan Hesse, Jenni Stanley, Andrew Jeffs
    Abstract


    MF15066  Accepted 14 July 2015
    Assessing wetland degradation and loss of ecosystem services in the Niger Delta, Nigeria
    Ayansina Ayanlade, Ulrike Proske
    Abstract


    MF14255  Accepted 08 July 2015
    Limited effectiveness of divers to mitigate ‘barrens’ formation by culling sea urchins while fishing for abalone
    John Sanderson, Scott Ling, Juan Dominguez, Craig Johnson
    Abstract


    MF15048  Accepted 02 July 2015
    Use of otolith quality flags to assess distributional dynamics in Baltic cod stocks
    Sven Stoetera, Uwe Krumme
    Abstract


    MF14413  Accepted 27 June 2015
    Looking backwards to look forwards: the role of natural history in temperate reef ecology
    Steve Hawkins, Nova Mieszkowska, Louise Firth, Michael Burrows, Katrin Bohn, Moira MacLean, Richard Thompson, Benny Chan, Colin Little, Gary Williams
    Abstract


    MF15035  Accepted 24 June 2015
    ASSESSING SPATIAL VARIATION OF SEAGRASS HABITAT STRUCTURE IN NEW CALEDONIA: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH
    Andrew Irving, Emma Jackson, Rebecca Hendry
    Abstract


    MF15055  Accepted 24 June 2015
    Comparative mitogenomic analyses reveal cryptic diversity of the bryozoan Bugula neritina Linnaeus, 1758 in the Yellow Sea
    Xin Shen, Mei Tian, Ka-Hou Chu, Jinfeng Wang, Shuai Chen, Huilian Liu, Xiaoheng Zhao, Fangqing Zhao
    Abstract


    MF15211  Accepted 22 June 2015
    Trajectory of an anthropogenically-induced ecological regime shift in a New Zealand shallow coastal lake
    Marc Schallenberg, Emilie Saulnier-Talbot
    Abstract


    MF15156  Accepted 22 June 2015
    Zoobenthos are minor dietary components of small omnivorous fishes in a shallow eutrophic lake
    Natsuru Yasuno, Yuki Chiba, Yasufumi Fujimoto, Kentaro Shindo, Tetsuo Shimada, Shuichi Shikano, Eisuke Kikuchi
    Abstract


    MF15185  Accepted 19 June 2015
    A commentary on ‘Long-term ecological trends of flow-dependent ecosystems in a major regulated river basin’ by Mathew J. Colloff, Peter Caley, Neil Saintilan, Carmel A. Pollino and Neville D. Crossman
    Richard Kingsford, Ralph Mac Nally, Alison King, Keith Walker, Gilad Bino, Ross Thompson, Skye Wassens, Paul Humphries
    Abstract


    MF15176  Accepted 19 June 2015
    Comparison of life histories of two deepwater sharks from eastern Australia: the piked spurdog and the Philippine spurdog
    Cassandra Rigby, Ross Daley, Colin Simpfendorfer
    Abstract


    MF15147  Accepted 15 June 2015
    Low diversity of helminth parasites in Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus (Clupeidae) from the Bay of Biscay
    Aurélie Dessier, Christine Dupuy, Thomas Trancart, Alexandre Audras, Paco Bustamante, Claudia Gérard
    Abstract


    MF14339  Accepted 15 June 2015
    Large tropical fishes and their use of the nearshore littoral, intertidal and subtidal habitat mosaic
    Merritt Adkins, Colin Simpfendorfer, Andrew Tobin
    Abstract


    MF15002  Accepted 11 June 2015
    Image-Enhanced Burnt Otoliths, Bomb Radiocarbon and the Growth Dynamics of Redfish (Sebastes mentella and S. fasciatus) off the eastern coast of Canada
    Steven Campana, Alexandra Valentin, Shayne MacLellan, Joanne Groot
    Abstract


    MF15057  Accepted 09 June 2015
    Microphytoplankton and ciliate communities’ structure and distribution in a stressed area of the south coast of Sfax, Tunisia (Eastern Mediterranean Sea)
    Amira REKIK, Jannet ELLOUMI, Dorra Chaari, Habib AYADI
    Abstract


    MF15056  Accepted 10 June 2015
    Variation in morphology and life history strategy of an exploited sparid fish
    Darren Parsons, Mark Morrison, Bronwyn Gillanders, Kendall Clements, Sarah Bury, Richard Bian, Keren Spong
    Abstract


    MF15094  Accepted 05 June 2015
    Experimental effects of ash deposition on macroinvertebrate assemblages in peatland streams
    Kerrylyn Johnston, Belinda Robson
    Abstract


    MF15044  Accepted 06 June 2015
    Population structure in a wide ranging coastal teleost (Argyrosomus japonicus, Sciaenidae) reflects marine biogeography across southern Australia
    Thomas Barnes, Claudia Junge, Steven Myers, Matthew Taylor, Paul Rogers, Greg Ferguson, Jason Lieschke, Stephen Donnellan, Bronwyn Gillanders
    Abstract


    MF15001  Accepted 05 June 2015
    Feeding ecology of two sympatric species of Acetes (Decapoda: Sergestidae) in Panguil Bay, the Philippines
    Ephrime Metillo, Emily Cadelinia, Ken-ichi Hayashizaki, Tsunoda Takashi, Shuhei Nishida
    Abstract


    MF14390  Accepted 04 June 2015
    Carbon and nutrient subsidies to a lowland river following floodplain inundation
    Daryl Nielsen, Robert Cook, Nathan Ning, Ben Gawne
    Abstract


    MF14373  Accepted 01 June 2015
    Widespread occurrence of coral diseases in central Maldives
    Simone Montano, Giovanni Strona, Davide Seveso, Davide Maggioni, Paolo Galli
    Abstract


    MF15099  Accepted 28 May 2015
    Surviving under pressure and protection: a review of the biology, ecology and population status of the highly vulnerable grouper, Epinephelus daemelii
    Malcolm Francis, David Harasti, Hamish Malcolm
    Abstract


    MF14243  Accepted 28 May 2015
    Marine and continental distribution and dynamic of the early spawning migration of twaite shad, Alosa fallax (Lacépède, 1803), and allis shad, Alosa alosa (Linnaeus, 1758), in the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula
    David Nachón, Micaela Mota, Carlos Antunes, María Servia, Fernando Cobo
    Abstract


    MF15123  Accepted 23 May 2015
    Developing a habitat classification typology for subtidal habitats in a temperate estuary in New South Wales, Australia
    Thomas Davis, David Harasti, Steven Smith
    Abstract


    MF14386  Accepted 20 May 2015
    Reproduction of French Angelfish Pomacanthus paru (Teleostei: Pomacanthidae) and implications for management of the ornamental fish trade in Brazil.
    Caroline Feitosa, Simone Marques, Maria Elisabeth de Araújo, Beatrice Ferreira
    Abstract


    MF14351  Accepted 19 May 2015
    Patterns of shelter use and their effects on the relative survival of subadult California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus)
    Amalia Harrington, Kevin Hovel
    Abstract


    MF15093  Accepted 12 May 2015
    Demersal chondrichthyans in the western Mediterranean: assemblages and biological parameters of their main species
    Sergio Ramirez, Francesc Ordines, Bàrbara Terrasa, Antonio Esteban, Cristina García, Beatriz Guijarro, Enric Massuti
    Abstract


    MF14414  Accepted 08 May 2015
    Home range size in juveniles of the temperate reef fish, the common triplefin (Forsterygion lapillum)
    Paul Mensink, Jeffrey Shima
    Abstract


    MF14159  Accepted 08 May 2015
    Reproductive pattern and sexual system of the nocturnal seagrass shrimp Ambidexter symmetricus (Decapoda: Caridea: Processidae) in a Florida bay
    Jennifer Rasch, Raymond Bauer
    Abstract


    MF15038  Accepted 06 May 2015
    Feeding dynamics of the fiddler crab Uca annulipes (H. Milne Edwards, 1837) in a non-tidal mangrove forest.
    Nasreen Peer, Nelson Miranda, Renzo Perissinotto, Jacqueline Raw
    Abstract


    MF14401  Accepted 06 May 2015
    Biology of a marine estuarine-opportunist fish species in a microtidal estuary, including comparisons among decades and with coastal waters.
    Lauren Veale, Peter Coulson, Norman Hall, Ian Potter
    Abstract


    MF15013  Accepted 04 May 2015
    High resolution movements of critically endangered hawksbill turtles help elucidate conservation requirements in northern Australia
    Xavier Hoenner, Scott Whiting, Mark Hamann, Colin Limpus, Dr Mark A. HINDELL, Clive McMahon
    Abstract


    MF14309  Accepted 29 April 2015
    Interspecific differences in larval production and dispersal in non-migratory galaxiids: implications for metapopulation structure
    Peter Jones, Gerry Closs
    Abstract


    MF14321  Accepted 27 April 2015
    Tasman Sea biological response to dust storm events during the austral spring of 2009
    Albert Gabric, Roger Cropp, Grant McTainsh, Harry Butler, Barbara Johnston, Tadhg O’Loingsigh, Dien Tran
    Abstract


    MF14370  Accepted 20 April 2015
    Spatial genetic subdivision among populations of the highly-migratory species (Istiompax indica) within the central Indo-Pacific
    Samuel Williams, Mike Bennett, Julian Pepperell, Jessica Morgan, Jenny Ovenden
    Abstract


    MF14262  Accepted 17 April 2015
    Using sedimentary diatoms to identify reference conditions and historical variability in shallow lake ecosystems in the Yangtze floodplain
    Xuhui Dong, Xiangdong Yang, Xu Chen, Qian Liu, Min Yao, Rong Wang, Min Xu
    Abstract


    MF14246  Accepted 14 April 2015
    How does the management of rice in natural ponds alter aquatic insect community functional structure?
    Marina Dalzochio, Renata Baldin, Cristina Stenert, Leonardo Maltchik
    Abstract


    MF14423  Accepted 13 April 2015
    A new tool in the toolbox for large-scale, high-throughput fisheries mark-recapture studies using genetic identification.
    Russell Bradford, Peta Hill, Campbell Davies, Peter Grewe
    Abstract


    MF15012  Accepted 11 April 2015
    Primacy of bottom-up effects on a butterflyfish assemblage
    Susannah Leahy, Garry Russ, Rene Abesamis
    Abstract


    MF15003  Accepted 09 April 2015
    Geographic distribution of the short-tailed river stingray, Potamotrygon brachyura: assessing habitat loss and fishing as threats to the world's largest obligate freshwater elasmobranch
    Luis Lucifora, Santiago Barbini, Sabina Llamazares Vegh, Pablo Scarabotti, Facundo Vargas, Agustín Solari, Ezequiel Mabragaña, Juan Díaz de Astarloa
    Abstract


    MF14424  Accepted 08 April 2015
    Olfactory responses of coral reef fishes to coral degradation and crown-of-thorns (Acanthaster planci)
    Amy Coppock, Naomi Gardiner, Geoffrey Jones
    Abstract


    MF14360  Accepted 09 April 2015
    How sensitive are invertebrates to riparian-zone replanting in stream ecosystems?
    Darren Giling, Ralph Mac Nally, Ross Thompson
    Abstract


    MF15023  Accepted 07 April 2015
    DETERMINING OPTIMAL SAMPLING STRATEGIES FOR MONITORING THREATENED ENDEMIC MACRO-INVERTEBRATES IN AUSTRALIA’S DISCHARGE SPRINGS
    Renee Rossini, Rod Fensham, Gimme Walter
    Abstract


    MF14391  Accepted 04 April 2015
    The contribution of migratory mesopelagic fishes to neuston fish assemblages across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
    Pilar Olivar, Juan Gonzalez-Gordillo, Jordi Salat, Guillem Chust, Andres Cózar, Maria Fernández de Puelles, Xabier Irigoyen
    Abstract


    MF14397  Accepted 31 March 2015
    Identification of human-made physical barriers to fish passage in the Wet Tropics region, Australia
    Frederieke Kroon, Seonaid Phillips
    Abstract


    MF14374  Accepted 30 March 2015
    A comparison of the physiological responses, behaviour and biotransformation of PSP toxins in a surf clam Paphies donacina and the green-lipped mussel Perna canaliculus
    Islay Marsden, Andrea Contreras, Lincoln MacKenzie, Murray Munro
    Abstract


    MF14357  Accepted 30 March 2015
    Influence of oceanic fronts on mesozooplankton abundance and grazing during spring in the Southwestern Atlantic
    Rubens Lopes, Catarina Marcolin, Frederico Brandini
    Abstract


    MF15004  Accepted 28 March 2015
    Trophic relationships of the platypus: insights from stable isotope and cheek pouch dietary analyses
    Melissa Klamt, Jennifer Davis, Ross Thompson, Richard Marchant, Tom Grant
    Abstract


    MF14248  Accepted 25 March 2015
    Morphologically similar, coexisting hard corals (Porites lobata and P. solida) display similar trophic isotopic ratios across reefs and depths
    Jeremiah Plass-Johnson, Christopher McQuaid, Jaclyn Hill
    Abstract


    MF14319  Accepted 20 March 2015
    Using paleoenvironmental records to guide restoration, conservation and adaptive management of Ramsar freshwater wetlands: Lessons from the Everglades, USA
    Melanie Riedinger-Whitmore
    Abstract


    MF14218  Accepted 18 March 2015
    SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THE SURF ZONE FAUNA OF TWO ECUADORIAN SANDY BEACHES
    Jose Marin Jarrin, Sandra Miño Quezada, Luis Dominguez Granda, Sonnia Guartatanga Argudo, Maria Cornejo
    Abstract


    MF14330  Accepted 17 March 2015
    Population dynamics of a high latitude coral Alveopora japonica Eguchi from Jeju Island, off the south coast of Korea
    Christophe Vieira, Keshavmurthy Shashank, Se-Jong Ju, Kiseong Hyeong, Inah Seo, Chang-Keun Kang, Hyun-Ki Hong, Chaolun Allen Chen, Kwang-Sik Choi
    Abstract


    MF14340  Accepted 02 March 2015
    Comparison of in situ and satellite sea surface temperature data from South Australia and Tasmania: How reliable are satellite data as a proxy for coastal temperatures in temperate southern Australia?
    Ben Stobart, Stephen Mayfield, Craig Mundy, Alistair Hobday, Jason Hartog
    Abstract


    MF14230  Accepted 14 February 2015
    Can tributary in-flows improve DOC regime recovery in a snowmelt river regulated by a large reservoir?
    Ann-Marie Rohlfs, Simon Mitrovic, Simon Williams, Daniel Coleman
    Abstract


    MF14193  Accepted 10 February 2015
    High-resolution, multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental changes recorded from Two Mile Lake, southern Western Australia: Implications for Ramsar-listed playa sites
    Chris Gouramanis, Patrick de deckker, Daniel Wilkins, John Dodson
    Abstract


    MF14187  Accepted 11 December 2014
    Implications of Environmental Trajectories for Limits of Acceptable Change: a case study of the Riverland Ramsar Site, South Australia
    Peter Newall, Lance Lloyd, Peter Gell, Keith Walker
    Abstract


    MF14222  Accepted 31 October 2014
    The Gippsland Lakes: management challenges posed by long-term environmental change
    Paul Boon, Perran Cook, Ryan Woodland
    Abstract


64


The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 25 September 2014
How much wetland has the world lost? Long-term and recent trends in global wetland area

Nick C. Davidson

2. Long-term ecological trends of flow-dependent ecosystems in a major regulated river basin

Matthew J. Colloff, Peter Caley, Neil Saintilan, Carmel A. Pollino and Neville D. Crossman

3. Published 27 April 2015
Age and growth of the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, in the western North Atlantic Ocean

Lisa J. Natanson and Gregory B. Skomal

4. Published 25 September 2014
A snapshot of the limnology of eastern Australian water bodies spanning the tropics to Tasmania: the land-use, climate, limnology nexus

Jie Christine Chang, Craig Woodward and James Shulmeister

5. Published 26 August 2014
Ecological effects of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) in a semi-arid floodplain wetland

Lorenzo Vilizzi, Leigh A. Thwaites, Benjamin B. Smith, Jason M. Nicol and Chris P. Madden

6. Published 24 October 2014
Habitat and space use of an abundant nearshore shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori

S. E. M. Munroe, C. A. Simpfendorfer and M. R. Heupel

7. Published 27 April 2015
Diversity in immature-shark communities along a tropical coastline

Peter M. Yates, Michelle R. Heupel, Andrew J. Tobin, Stephen K. Moore and Colin A. Simpfendorfer

8. Published 26 February 2015
Collaborative approaches to accessing and utilising historical citizen science data: a case-study with spearfishers from eastern Australia

Daniel C. Gledhill, Alistair J. Hobday, David J. Welch, Stephen G. Sutton, Matthew J. Lansdell, Mathew Koopman, Adrian Jeloudev, Adam Smith and Peter R. Last

9. Published 25 September 2014
Historical changes in mean trophic level of southern Australian fisheries

Heidi K. Alleway, Sean D. Connell, Tim M. Ward and Bronwyn M. Gillanders

10. Published 22 May 2015
Repairing Australia's estuaries for improved fisheries production – what benefits, at what cost?

Colin Creighton, Paul I. Boon, Justin D. Brookes and Marcus Sheaves

11. Published 24 October 2014
Does coastal topography constrain marine biogeography at an oceanographic interface?

Jonathan M. Waters, Scott A. Condie and Luciano B. Beheregaray

12. Published 7 November 2014
Population structure and biology of shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, in the south-west Indian Ocean

J. C. Groeneveld, G. Cliff, S. F. J. Dudley, A. J. Foulis, J. Santos and S. P. Wintner

13. Published 27 January 2015
Quantifying uncertainty in environmental indices: an application to an estuarine health index

Melissa J. Dobbie and David Clifford

14. Published 5 December 2014
Use of underwater video to assess freshwater fish populations in dense submersed aquatic vegetation

Kyle L. Wilson, Micheal S. Allen, Robert N. M. Ahrens and Michael D. Netherland

15. Published 7 November 2014
Age and growth of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) in the north-western Pacific

Hua Hsun Hsu, Shoou Jeng Joung, Robert E. Hueter and Kwang Ming Liu

16. Published 27 April 2015
The influence of an offshore artificial reef on the abundance of fish in the surrounding pelagic environment

Molly E. Scott, James A. Smith, Michael B. Lowry, Matthew D. Taylor and Iain M. Suthers

17. Published 5 December 2014
Spatial and temporal patterns in the distribution of large bivalves in a permanently open temperate estuary: implications for management

Alan J. Kendrick, Michael J. Rule, Paul S. Lavery and Glenn A. Hyndes

18. Published 7 November 2014
Ecological response of Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum) to extended drought and flooding along the River Murray, South Australia (1997–2011) and implications for environmental flow management

Tanya M. Doody, Simon N. Benger, Jodie L. Pritchard and Ian C. Overton

19. Published 5 December 2014
In situ effects of human disturbances on coral reef-fish assemblage structure: temporary and persisting changes are reflected as a result of intensive tourism

Tiago Albuquerque, Miguel Loiola, José de Anchieta C. C. Nunes, José Amorim Reis-Filho, Cláudio L. S. Sampaio and Antoine O. H. C. Leduc

20. Published 27 January 2015
Migratory patterns and habitat use of the sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus) in the western North Atlantic

Shara M. Teter, Bradley M. Wetherbee, Dewayne A. Fox, Chi H. Lam, Dale A. Kiefer and Mahmood Shivji


      
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